Breakup Over Redoubt

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 29 20:51:01 2007 UTC

On the early morning of March 24, 2007 the aurora came strong like a healthy newborn screaming its lungs out upon the sight of its new world.Or maybe that was just me screaming in excitement over the sight of an incredibly active aurora. For a while I had begun to think that the aurora was broken. Tonight proved it wasn't. In this image we are looking northwest from Deep Creek, Alaska over Cook Inlet towards Redoubt Volcano seen at the bottom left. Nice rays reach up into the sky and a nitrogen fringing is seen at the bottom of a bright and active rayed band. I used a home-built 6x9 medium format camera with a 98mm f1.4 lens and Fuji Provia 100F in this 10-second exposure. Copyright(c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: www.auroradude.com or visit: auroradude@acsalaska.net

Moon Over Drum

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 8 00:46:01 2007 UTC

Our moon, a couple days past first quarter, hangs over 12, 400 foot Mount Drum of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. Drum is an extinct volcano and shows heavy erosion by glaciation. It is located at the western edge of our nation's largest national park in south-central Alaska. The moon is high in the northeast after refusing to set on this morning and for two more days as well. Its orbit had carried it far north in the sky and for latitudes above about 61 degrees north it was seen to only skim the northern horizon without completely dissappearing. It was nice to have such a devoted companion along. I used a 6x7cm. medium format camera and 300mm lens to record the scene. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photopgraphy Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Them Pesky Clouds

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 8 00:09:01 2007 UTC

There's nothing like a rapidly approaching cloud bank to cut a viewing session short. Fortunately for me I had time to test a new lens before they covered the sky completely and now that I look at the images I am ecstatic. The lens is a 98mm f/ 1.4 light bucket that covers 6x9 medium format film. With the speed of this lens I will be able to record the auroras in great detail on slow film with relatively fast exposures of less than 10 seconds. If I use a faster film exposures of 1-2 seconds could be realized. Upon examining the originals I was amazed at not only the sharpness but its ability to record faint light. Stars of magnitude 8 are clearly visible and I suspect some even fainter. This is many times beyond human vision and all this in an exposure of 8 seconds on 100 speed film! This image was part of a test session and is acquired along the Copper River north of Chulitina, Alaska on February 26, 2007. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Auroral Arc over Chena River

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 7 22:54:01 2007 UTC

A bright arc forms in the northern sky as seen from the bank of the frozen Chena River east of Fairbanks, Alaska on this frigid November 11, 2006 early morning. I used a 38mm wide-angle lens on a home-built 6x7cm. medium-format camera to record the show on Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Conytact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visti: www.auroradude.com

Flickering Lights Chena River

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 7 22:54:01 2007 UTC

The aurora had begun to pulsate anf flicker in the early morning hours of November 11, 2007. This view is looking westward along the frozen Chena River about an hour's drive east of Fairbanks, Alaska. These type of displays are little understood and the subject of recent rocket launches from th research station at Poker Flats north of Fairbanks. I used a 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100VS film to record the gentle lights. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Overhead Pulsing aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 7 22:32:01 2007 UTC

After the main substorm often the aurora begins to flicker and pulsate during the wee hours before dawn. This was the case on the morning of November 11, 2007. This image is of the faint aurora overhead as it slowly pulsated and undulated overhead. I used a home-built 6x7 cn. medium format camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100VS film to record the gentle light. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

The Cloud Approaches

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 7 21:55:01 2007 UTC

This is the view of the Alaska's Copper River near its confluence with the Tonsina at the edge of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. We are looking to the northwest where a cloudbank was rapidly approaching that would soon put an end to the modest show that the aurora was now producing. I used a home-built 6x7 cm. medium-format camera with a 38mm lens and Kodak E100VS to record the scene. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Arc over Willow Lake

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 7 21:34:01 2007 UTC

The moon was low in the northwestern sky and cast a feeble golden light on the ice covered Wrangell mountains as seen from Willow Lake. A gentle arc of the aurora spans the northern sky on this frigid Alaska night where I had earlier recorded minus 42 on my digital thermometer. I used a 6x7 home-built camera and a 38mm lens to record this 1-minute exposure on Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson NIght Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Moonlight Night Willow Lake

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Mar 6 21:29:01 2007 UTC

The aurora is visible as a faint arc over the moonlit volcanic peaks of the Alaska's Wrangell St. Elias National Park while stars blaze above in the night sky. Willow lake lies frozen on this February 25, 2007 early morning. I used a 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100VS film during a 3-minute exposure to better show the faint aurora. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax PHotography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Another First

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Mar 6 04:34:01 2007 UTC

This is just a test image. I waited for suitable moonlight and hauled out one of my latest cameras. This lunker is a modified Cold-War era camera built for night reconnasance images on 9x9 film. I attached a vacuum-modified 8x10 film back and after a little tweaking it looks like it will produce an acceptable image. Now I just need to have the right auroral conditions and spend some time in the gym as it comes in around 50 pounds. This shot was from near Homer, Alaska on March 1st 2007 It is looking westward at Illiamna volcano about 50 miles distant. It is a 40-second exposure on Fuji Provia 100F. Below is a detail from the image as it is way too big to be appreciated on a computer monitor. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Another First: Detail

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Mar 6 04:13:01 2007 UTC

This is a detail from the full-frame image seen above. The computer monitor just cannot show all of the image at full resolution. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Star Trails over Wrangell St. Elias

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Mar 5 21:34:01 2007 UTC

This is a one-hour exposure using a specially modified 30mm lens on a 4x5 large format camera. It creates a circular fisheye effect that covers 180 degrees from West to East and straight down to straight overhead. I took the image along the Copper River at the edge of Wrangell - St. Elias National Park, Alaska on the night of February 25, 2007. Some of the Volcanic peaks in the park that range from 14,000 feet to over 18,000 feet can be seen in the distance. The bright star Vega creates the trail near center and Arcturus is rising at the right. Polaris can be seen near the top. Imaging star trails is a great way to pass the time while waiting for the aurorae. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

The Weathermaker

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Mar 5 21:13:01 2007 UTC

This is a shot I took about 1:00a.m. local time on the 26th of February along the Copper River. The aurora had begun to act up a little but another surprise was quickly approaching. Clouds. The weather had been predicted to be clear and cold leaving this cloud mass acomplete surprise. It approached so rapidly that the entire sky was completely covered over the next ten minutes. I drove then an hour north and found clear skies again (But no aurora).The next day I was studying satellite imagery and found that the cloud had been formed by 20,320 foot mount McKinley a few hundred miles away. As it scraped the upper atmosphere it formed a cloud plume several hundred miles long. Luckily, it swung westward in the upper level winds and the sky was again clear upon its passage. McKinley has been called "The Weather Maker" and this is one example why. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

SOLITUDE

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Mar 5 20:38:01 2007 UTC

Having no other subjects at hand I sometimes will jump into a photo myself. Here I am standing along the banks of the Chena River about an hour east of Fairbanks, Alaska enjoying a few hours of a relatively quiet aurora on the night of November 11, 2006. I used a home-built 6x7 medium-format camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens and a 60 second exposure on Kodak E100VS film for this image. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Strange Moon

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Mar 5 09:07:01 2007 UTC

At first there might not be much unusual about this shot of the moon on the horizon. That is, until you find out that it is on the northern horizon and that it might seem to be at an unusual angle. This is because on this day the moon did not set at latitudes of about 62 degrees north. In the cycles of the moon its orbit has brought it above 28 degrees north declination in the sky. That makes it very high in the sky at times and as you get further north it might not even set for a few days at a time. This morning it just inched along from west to east touching the treetops as it went but never fully disappearing below the horizon. I shot this moon from near Eureka Summit a couple hours NE of Anchorage on the morning of February 26, 2007. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

First Light

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Mar 5 08:44:01 2007 UTC

It's always exciting to see the aurora. It's even more exciting to capture it with a camera that was scrapped togeather from odds and ends over months and weeks of tinkering and then to see the result of all this effort as a nice sharp image on a large piece of film. My latest tool for capturing the aurora uses a 6x9 cm medium format film and employs a 98mm f1.4 lens. This is the fastest lens ever produced for medium format and it should allow short exposures on slow film. This particular one is a 10-second exposure on Fuji Provia 100F. This was during a very modest auroral display on February 25th over the Wrangell St.Elias National Park, Alaska. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Moon, Venus February 19, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Feb 20 04:19:01 2007 UTC

Here's Venus now below the moon as seen from near Homer, Alaska. Augustine Volcano can be seen on the distant horizon. I used my wife's Olympus C-50 digital camera (exposure/settings unknown). Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Moon and Venus February 18, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Feb 19 05:21:01 2007 UTC

Here's one of Venus and the Moon from Homer, Alaska at 60 degrees north taken about 7:00 AST on the 18th of February. (04:00 UT on 02/19/07) I used my wife's little Olympus C-50 point and shoot digital. Settings and exposure unknown. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

February Sunset Kamishak Bay

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Feb 15 20:55:01 2007 UTC

Thought I'd post something to help you all get through the winter blues. There's nothing like a nice warm sunset. This one is taken on February 4th 2007 from near our house about 5 miles out of Homer, Alaska. We are looking over Cook Inlet towards Kamishak Bay. Mount Douglas is on the left with Augustine Volcano on the right. Douglas is about 95 miles distant and augustine about 75. To the left of Douglas is warm tropical Hawaii - about 4000 miles south! Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Mount Douglas Four-Peaked Volcano

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Feb 15 00:07:01 2007 UTC

Mount Douglas is the tallest peak in this shot from the Homer, Alaska area. Douglas is a volcano thought to be extinct. Four Peak is also a volcano thought to be extinct and is located behind and just left of Douglas. As you can see, Four-Peaked volcano is beginning to wake up. It has been seen smoking and steaming for a few months now and it is rumbling with many small earthquakes below it daily. It was thought to have last erupted over 10,000 years ago. This shot clearly shows a steam/gas plume drifting for many miles downwind of the volcano which is located over 90 miles SSW of Homer. I used a Pentax 67 medium format camera with a 300mm lens for this shot right at sunset on February 4th, 2007. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska,net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Venus and Four-Peaked Volcano

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 14 23:26:01 2007 UTC

Never a dull moment in Alaska. Here, we have Venus shining brightly at the top right and at the left on the horizon is Mount Douglas and Four-Peaked Volcano. Four-Peaked was thought to have been extinct but a few months ago it woke up. It is seen here with a steam and gas plume streaching for many miles down wind. Four-Peaked is about 90 miles from the Homer area where this photo was taken. I used a 4x5 large format camera and a 300mm lens on Fuji Provia 100F film for this shot. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Comet McNaught Evening January 9, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 14 22:52:01 2007 UTC

Here's a shot of the comet on the evening of January 9, 2007 as clouds were starting to roll in. This is cropped from an exposure using a Pentax 67 medium format camera with a 300mm lens at f/4 and a 5-second exposure on Fuji Provia 100F film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Comet McNaught Evening January 8, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 14 22:52:01 2007 UTC

This image shows the comet in the evening sky. It is taken with a Pentax 67 using a 300mm lens, Kodak E100VS film and a 5-second exposure at f/4. There is a little more tail visible than in the shot taken on this morning. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Comet McNaught January 8, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Feb 13 03:37:01 2007 UTC

Comet McNaught can be seen at the center of this image taken on the morning of January 8, 2007. It was already getting bright at the approach of dawn but the comet was easily visible at about the same brightness of Venus at around Magnitude -4. As it passed close to the sun about a week later the comet became even brighter and was even seen in full daylight. It then moved into the southern hemispere where it became an awesome sight against dark skies. I felt lucky to have seen it at all. This image was taken from near Homer, Alaska using a Pentax 6x7 medium format camera equipped with a 300mm lens and Kodak E100VS film and a 1/2 second exposure at f/5.6. copyright(c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Gently Down the Stream

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Feb 11 01:20:01 2007 UTC

The early morning hours had brought the aurora into a stage of gently pulsating and flickering shapes of diffuse light. This view is looking downstream to the northwest along a bend in the Chena River about 50 miles East of Fairbanks. I used a 6x7 cm. camera with a 38mm lens and Kodak E100Vs film to record the winter scene. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Moonlight Night on the Chena

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Feb 11 01:01:01 2007 UTC

Moonlight sparkles off the snow while the stars twinkle in the clear sky. A gentle aurora graces the sky with its greenish light. The minus-twenty air caused great groans and cracks as the ice on the Chena River thickened on this November 11, 2006 night. I had driven about 50 miles east of Fairbanks to escape the light pollution and the smog of the city and found myself along this icy stretch of the river for a few hours of meditation. I used a home-built 6x7 cm. medium-format camera and 38mm wide-angle lens on Kodak E100VS film for this image. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Venus, Mercury February 4, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Feb 10 23:09:01 2007 UTC

While millions were watching the Bears get beat by the Colts I had other things on my mind - a beautiful sunset and a planetary line up in the fresh air outside. This shot is taken from Diamond Ridge near Homer Alaska a couple hours after sunset on Super-Bowl sunday. Venus is at top left with Mercury near the center. Augustine Volcano is seen at the right. I used a 4x5 large format camera with a 300mm lens and a 20 second exposure on Fuji Provia 100F film to record the moment. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Comet McNaught January 9, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Feb 10 21:15:01 2007 UTC

This image of the morning sky over Kachemak Bay from Homer, Alaska contains a tiny speck of light that was comet McNaught. The comet is seen near the center just over the mountains. This image was taken using a 300mm lens and 4x5 large format camera with a two-second exposure on Fuji Velvia 100F film. A crop fr4om the center of this image with the comet over the mountains can be seen below. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Comet Mcnaught January 9, 2007

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Feb 10 20:56:01 2007 UTC

This is a crop from the 4x5 original seen above. Comet McNaught is seen in strong morning twilight above the wind-blown Kenai Mountains and Kachemak Bay near Homer, Alaska. I used a 4x5 camera and 300mm lens at f/4 on Fuji Velvia 100F film for this two-second exposure. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Comet McNaught in Full Daylight 01/14/07

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Jan 14 23:00:01 2007 UTC

Here is my best attempt at taking a shot of Mcnaught in the daytime. This was taken at about local noon on January 14, 2007 using an olympus digital camera at the eyepiece of a pair of 11x80 binoculars. The comet was very difficult to spot as it was only about 5 degrees east of the sun and from our latitude of 60 degrees north, the elevation of the comet was only about 7 degrees above the southern horizon. I used some dark arrows to help locate the comet in this field of view. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

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