Beautiful Dawn.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 3 05:15:01 2007 UTC

Dawn approaches on the 31st of January 2007. The Pacific Ocean gently laps against the beach while Comet McNaught hangs gracefully in the sky above Cape Kidnappers, Hawke's Bay. This truly remarkable comet has been a gift to astronomers and lay-people alike, the world over. Photo details: Canon 350D, 25 second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

 

Additional Images by this Photographer:

An Imperfect World.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Jun 25 08:50:01 2008 UTC

Science once held that the universe outside our world was a perfect one, with all objects out there being a glorious testament to the divine creator. That idea came crashing to earth in 1609, when Galileo Galilei pointed his home-made telescope at the moon and found it was a rugged, mountainous and cratered world. The illusion of perfection was shattered. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400 @ prime focus through an 80mm Vixen refracting telescope, 1/320th second exposure. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Ebb & Flow.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun May 4 00:08:01 2008 UTC

The time of solar minimum is that of a star with a split personality. Magnetic sun-spots from the old, dying cycle can overlap with new cycle spots. The three groups in this image are all from old cycle number 23, and will possibly be some of the last we will see - NASA scientists predict the new cycle number 24 will begin to be felt before this year is out. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400 @ prime focus through an 80mm Vixen refracting telescope, fitted with a solar filter, 1/1250th second exposure. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Giant On The Water.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Mar 7 03:25:01 2008 UTC

Orion, the hunter, reflects nicely in the surface of Lake Tutira. This area was a traditional hunting site for local Maori, who depended on food provided by the vast bird-life that once resounded in the dawn chorus. Clearing of the forests for farmland almost silenced the birds, but now the trees are making a comeback, and so are the birds. Bring on the chorus! Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400, 12 1/2 minute exposure with a Canon EF 15mm Fisheye lens @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Sailors' Moon.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 23 01:45:01 2008 UTC

A full moon rises above the sleepy inner harbour, Napier. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800, 4.5 second exposure with a Sigma 18-200mm lens @ f-10. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Pac Man.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Feb 7 09:43:01 2008 UTC

This partial solar eclipse was widely seen from New Zealand on February 7, 2008. Taken near the time of maximum coverage, the sun looks like an early computer game icon. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400 @ prime focus through a 80mm Vixen refracting telescope, 1/800th second exposure. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Evasive Maneuvers.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Jan 14 22:01:01 2008 UTC

January 13th, I was observing at "Stardate 2008" in Hastings, New Zealand, when the ISS flew over early in the evening. I grabbed the camera and tripod, set the frame to include Orion and Mars, and hit the button for an ISS trail shot. However, I didn't quite get the result I expected... The ISS did an evasive maneuver to avoid hitting the belt stars in Orion, before resuming straight flight... Well, at least that's how the picture shows it...

It turns out I hadn't tightened the camera knuckle properly, resulting in the camera slowly tilting during the exposure, resulting in the weirdest star trail image I've ever seen. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800, 68 second exposure with a Canon EF 15mm fisheye lens @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Tutira Dusk.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Dec 27 10:24:01 2007 UTC

A beautiful dusk settles over a stand of Cordyline australis at Lake Tutira, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800, 1/200th second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens @ f-9. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Ghostly Horse.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Dec 5 09:01:01 2007 UTC

Within the constellation of Orion, lays the Horse-Head Nebula. This cloud of hydrogen is a dark feature that would go unnoticed if not for the brightly lit clouds that linger in the background. This image was shot from Possum Observatory, Gisborne. Thanks must go to John Drummond & John Burt for their equipment and expertise. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800 6 x 3 minute exposures at prime focus through a 16" telescope. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Flame Of The West.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 27 08:54:01 2007 UTC

Flames of sunset colour lick across the entrance of the inner harbour, Napier. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400, 1/60th second exposure with a Sigma 18-200mm lens @ f-4. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Twister!

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun Nov 11 10:47:01 2007 UTC

November 11, 2007 was a beautiful spring day in Hawke's Bay. However, thunder storms formed along the mountain ranges then headed east towards Napier. The largest of these produced my first tornado of the year, and it was a real good one. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400, 1/320th second exposure with a Sigma 18-200mm lens @ f-8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Lagoon & Triffid.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Oct 18 04:02:01 2007 UTC

Star forming regions fill the Milky Way in the direction of Sagittarius. Two beautiful examples are the Lagoon Nebula (M8) and Triffid Nebula (M20). Both objects are full of hot, young blue stars that cause the surrounding gas clouds to glow with glorious colour. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800, 2 1/2 minute exposure with a Canon EF 135mm lens @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Red Moon.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Aug 29 12:49:01 2007 UTC

August 28, 2007 was the first total lunar eclipse seen from New Zealand for more than seven years. It was a beautiful event with clean golden colours, and was worth the wait. Photo details: Canon 350D @ ISO 800, through an 8" telescope. The exposures ranged from 1/3200th to 1.3 seconds. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Digital Moon.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Jul 27 07:28:01 2007 UTC

My first decent digital image of our planet's incredible satellite; the Moon. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 800 @ prime focus through a 6 inch refracting telescope, 1/400th second exposure. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Solstice Stone.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Jul 14 04:17:01 2007 UTC

The sun glides to its southern most point of the year on December 21st. The southern summer solstice marks the true start of warmer weather. On that evening, the sun will set directly on top of the solstice stone. Photo details: Canon 350D, ISO 400, 1/250th second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm DC lens @ f-11. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Rainbow Cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun Jun 3 02:03:01 2007 UTC

On the morning of January 14th, 2007, I was hunting for daylight a glimpse of comet McNaught. I was using a street light to block the sun, when alone came a small scrap of cloud. As it got close to the sun, it came alive with vivid rainbow colours and I took this shot. It was forgotten about shortly after when the comet came into view, but now has its chance to shine again. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/1000th second exposure with an EF 75-300mm lens, ISO 200 @ f-13. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz or visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Romantic Beacon.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Apr 11 11:07:01 2007 UTC

The busy port-city of Napier bathes under its own light on April 8, 2007. Not to be out-done, the moon casts a river of light across the peaceful Hawke Bay to Westshore, where onlookers relax and enjoy the romantic view. Photo details: Canon 350D, 2.5 second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-4. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Electrical Storm.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 10 05:05:01 2007 UTC

February 9, 2007 was a hot Hawke's Bay day, and some active thunder storms soon formed. Only one of them lasted until after dark, but it gave me my first opportunity to shoot some lightning. Photo details: Canon 350D, 20 second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens, ISO 100 @ f-8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

The Great Daylight Comet Of 2007.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 3 07:17:01 2007 UTC

I stepped outside at midday on Sunday the 14th of January, with my binoculars and camera, to try and photograph Comet McNaught (C/2006 P1). I was not prepared for what I saw... Blocking out the sun with a street light, the comet was as clear and sharp as I could never have imagined. The compact coma was surrounded by a bright, diffuse halo. About 1.5 degrees of broad tail was visible with the naked eye. Now that is what I call a great comet! It was just the start of the adventure. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/1000th second exposure with a Canon EF 75-300mm lens, ISO 200 @ f-11. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Comet McNaught - Twilight Wonder #1

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 3 06:59:01 2007 UTC

January 18th 2007 turned out to be the first clear night of the week in Hastings, New Zealand. It was time to hunt some comet! McNaught put on a show that I will never forget. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1.6 second exposure with a Canon EF 75-300mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-5.6. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Comet McNaught - Twilight Wonder #2

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 3 06:42:01 2007 UTC

As twilight faded over Hastings, New Zealand on January 18, 2007, McNaught steadily brightened revealing a glorious tail. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1.3 second exposure with a Canon EF 75-300mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-4.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Comet McNaught - Twilight Wonder #3

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Mar 10 07:48:01 2009 UTC

Darkness was setting in on January 18th, 2007 and the full glory of this comet began to be revealed. It was truly an awesome sight that set the whole neighbourhood in a buzz. If I never see another comet, the memories of this night will last me a lifetime. Photo details: Canon 350D, 15 second exposure with a Canon EF 75-300mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-4.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

The Extravagant Tail Of A Great Comet.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Jul 4 08:47:01 2007 UTC

Like a spray of water from a passing jet-boat, the magnificent tail of Comet McNaught fans across the western sky on the evening of January 19, 2007. In this image taken at "Stardate 2007" the brilliant head of the comet is already set behind hills to the west. The tail did not finish setting until well after midnight. Photo details: Canon 350D, 69 second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-4.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz or visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Moonlight Comet.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Feb 3 05:50:02 2007 UTC

After a week of cloudy evenings, the night of the 30th of January 2007 was clear. Comet McNaught had now faded significantly, but was still an easy naked eye object despite the near-full phase of the moon. Photo details: Canon 350D, 13 second exposure with a Canon 50mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Circumpolar Comet.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Apr 6 10:55:01 2007 UTC

Early in the morning of the 31st of January 2007, Comet McNaught is now far enough South that it no longer sets from most of New Zealand. Myself and many other observers took advantage of this fact to see the comet in dark skies again after the moon had set. Photo details: Canon 350D, 30 second exposure with a Canon 50mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Serenity.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun May 31 05:00:01 2009 UTC

First light on the 31st of January 2007. Comet McNaught floats above the lagoon at Clive, Hawke's Bay. The scene was so peaceful, only being disturbed by the occasional splash of fish jumping in the mirror-like waters. The lights in the distance are the townships of Clive, Haumoana, Te Awanga and Clifton. The faint 'smudge' at upper right is the SMC. Photo details: Canon 350D, 46 second exposure with a Sigma 18-125mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

December 15, 2006 (1107 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Dec 18 09:38:01 2006 UTC

The Southern sky had been bright all evening, and sometimes it could be seen pulsing with extra energy as a weak aurora tried to get stronger. Photo details: Canon 350D, 2 1/2 minute exposure with a Canon EF 20mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

December 15, 2006 (1214 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Dec 18 09:19:01 2006 UTC

The storm finally gathered some strength and these rays appeared in the south. Photo details: Canon 350D, 32 second exposure with a Canon EF 20mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

December 15, 2006 (1215 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Dec 18 09:00:01 2006 UTC

These rays slowly crept west along the horizon as the storm progressed. Photo details: Canon 350D, 36 second exposure with a Canon EF 20mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

December 15, 2006 (1216 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Dec 18 09:00:01 2006 UTC

This ray lingered briefly near the Southern constellation, Grus. The first decent aurora of solar cycle 24 lasted only a few minutes, but it was worth the wait. Photo details: Canon 350D, 48 second exposure with a Canon EF 20mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

King of Nebulae.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Apr 6 10:37:01 2007 UTC

In the constellation of Orion there are many areas of interest, but most spectacular is the great Orion nebula - M42. This object is 1,500 light years away and brimming with new stars, many of which appear to be in the process of planetary formation. An easy target in small telescopes, this is probably one of the most commonly viewed objects in the night sky. Photo details: Canon 350D, 4 minute exposure with an 80mm refractor at f-5, ISO 400. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

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