King of Nebulae.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Apr 6 10:37:01 2007 UTC

In the constellation of Orion there are many areas of interest, but most spectacular is the great Orion nebula - M42. This object is 1,500 light years away and brimming with new stars, many of which appear to be in the process of planetary formation. An easy target in small telescopes, this is probably one of the most commonly viewed objects in the night sky. Photo details: Canon 350D, 4 minute exposure with an 80mm refractor at f-5, ISO 400. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Little Eyes.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 7 05:24:01 2006 UTC

Around the world, different cultures have different names for M-45. Most commonly used are the "Pleiades," or the "Seven Sisters." Other names include Subaru and Matariki. Matariki is the name given by the Maori of New Zealand. This loosely means 'little eyes.' While the names and legends are widely varied, one common thread runs true. Many cultures did, or still do, use these stars as a seasonal marker, the heliacal (pre-dawn) rising often denoting the start of a new year. In the southern hemisphere, this coincides roughly with the winter solstice, and is celebrated with feasting and fire festivals. The cluster itself is full of young, hot stars that are illuminating a cloud of dust with pale blue light. Photo details: Canon 350D, 80 second exposure with a Sigma 70-200mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Great Glob.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 7 04:55:01 2006 UTC

One of the finest individual objects in the southern sky would undoubtedly be 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This globular cluster lays in the constellation of Tucana, the toucan. Containing approximately 100,000 stars, this object looks like a fuzzy star with unaided vision, but binoculars or small telescopes provide breath-taking views. Photo details: Canon 350D, 3 minute exposure with an 80mm refractor at f-5, ISO 400. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Heavenly Flower.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Apr 6 10:55:01 2007 UTC

In the constellation of Monoceros sits the open cluster NGC 2442. This group of 16 stars is relatively young by celestial standards. Evidence for this can be seen in the surrounding cloud of ionised hydrogen. The cloud glows pink under the radiation from the hot stars at the centre. This cloud, NGC 2237, is better known as the Rosette Nebula. Photo details: Canon 350D, 5 minute exposure with a Sigma 70-200mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Beautiful Neighbour.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Mar 28 11:45:01 2007 UTC

As seen from New Zealand, the great galaxy in Andromeda (M31) rises only a few degrees above the northern horizon. However, that does not mean it isn't worth the effort to observe it. It is a beautiful spiral that can be resolved with a modest telescope. The dark dust-lanes can easily bee seen along with two companion galaxies (M110 & M32)in this image. Photo details: Canon 350D, 4 x 90 second exposures with a 200mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Funnel Cloud - Eerie Spectacle.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Dec 6 07:59:01 2006 UTC

Spring is often a time of unsettled weather. This was definitely the case on the evening of October 3rd, 2006 in Hastings, New Zealand. As I drove home from work I saw two funnel clouds and a tornado over farmland, but had no camera to catch the action. Once home, and with camera in hand, I went hunting for more, and bagged a beauty! This funnel came from a wall cloud over town and lasted just long enough for this shot. All that action in just 45 minutes! Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/80th second exposure with an EF-S 18-55mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-6.3. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Nocturnal Bird.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Nov 20 09:15:01 2006 UTC

On the edge of the Sagittarius star-clouds lies a region of dark nebula, commonly known as the 'Pipe Nebula.' However, here in New Zealand this is often referred to as the 'Kiwi,' the nocturnal flightless bird that symbolises our nation. In this image, the kiwi faces left with the pipe nebula forming the beak and head. The bulky body is supported by two sturdy legs and is covered with fluffy "feathers." M8 and M20 sit just above the curve of the kiwi's back. Who ever said kiwis can't fly? Photo details: Canon 350D, 5 minute exposure with an EF 50mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

ISS and STS-115

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Sep 18 09:58:01 2006 UTC

The Shuttle Atlantis glows brightly in the sunlight after undocking from the International Space Station (ISS) during STS-115 in September, 2006. Photo details: Canon 350D, 15 second exposure with an EF 50mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-5.6. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Dawn Bow

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Aug 12 23:28:01 2006 UTC

On August 12, 2006 I was driving south to Wellington with friends, the sun slowly rising behind us. When it did, it illuminated this rainbow with the beautiful colours of dawn. Note how the sky inside the bow is much redder than that outside it. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/60th second exposure with an EF-S 18-55mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-5.6. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Over The Moon.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Jun 14 21:43:01 2007 UTC

This image incorporates two of my favourite hobbies: Gazing at the moon and soaring high in a beautiful glider. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/400th second exposure with an EF 80-200mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz or visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Blue-Sky Bow.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Jun 12 07:43:01 2006 UTC

A strong winter blast raced through New Zealand on June 12th. When it had passed, this vivid double bow was left hanging in the clear, blue sky. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/500th second exposure with an EF-S 18-35mm lens, ISO 200 @ f-14. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Frosty Sky.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Jun 12 09:39:01 2006 UTC

June 8th was cold and frosty night that produced this beautiful 22 degree Lunar halo surrounding Jupiter at right, and Spica at left. A faint inner halo can also be seen. Photo details: Canon 350D, 7 second exposure with an EF-S 18-35mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Planetary Trio.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun Jun 4 22:17:01 2006 UTC

The evening of June 6th, 2005 was lovely not only for its sun-set. The three jewels of Saturn (upper left), Venus (centre), and Mercury (bottom) added to the spectacle as they neared their closest approach. Photo details: Minolta camera, 3 second exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Fuji Provia 400F slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Dome Dog.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri May 26 10:01:01 2006 UTC

With time and money, it is hoped the Matariki telescope will be the largest in New Zealand's North Island, but in the mean-time, the bare structure of the dome nicely frames a bright and well coloured sundog. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/800th second exposure with an 18-35mm lens, ISO 200 @ f-20. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Scorpion Rising.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Apr 11 10:49:01 2007 UTC

The southern winter sets in as the scorpion rises early in the eastern evening sky. Jupiter is the bright jewel below Antares, the heart of the scorpion. Photo details: Canon 350D, 2 minute exposure with a 20mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-3.5. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Digital Sunset.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Mar 28 09:27:01 2007 UTC

This stunning sunset was one of my first targets with my new toy - a digital SLR. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1/200th second exposure with an 18-35mm lens, ISO 400 @ f-10. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Carina - Inside the Key-hole.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Nov 2 07:45:01 2006 UTC

The glowing pink clouds of the Carina Nebula reside more than six thousand light years away in the constellation Carina, the Keel. Home and birth-place of the massive binary stars of Eta Carina, this part of heaven once laid claim to the title of the second brightest star in our sky. This happened during the nineteenth century, when the pair underwent a spectacular brightening. It has long since fallen to below naked eye brightness, however in the near future it may regain that title. It is now classed as a cataclysmic variable, and the past decade has seen mysterious changes in its brightness and colour. The inner part of this nebula is known as the Key-Hole; very appropriate when we think of the secrets locked inside. Mysteries aside, we do know that the star is doomed, and one day, possibly soon, it will flare bright enough to cast strong shadows for a long period. Photo details: Canon 350D, 1 minute exposure with a Sigma 70-200mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Amazing Antares.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun Jun 3 01:44:01 2007 UTC

On the border between Scorpio and Ophiuchus, is a wonderfully colourful and exotic part of our galaxy; the Rho Ophiuchus star clouds. This region is rich in heavy elements produced inside massive stars similar to the red giant, Antares. The colours come from a mixture of reflection and emission nebula. Usually Emission nebulae are red, due to hydrogen, but here there are such high levels of heavy elements that the clouds glow like a celestial rainbow. Antares is further adding to the mix by producing massive amounts of carbon. The very bright 'star' at bottom left is the Planet Jupiter. Photo details: Canon 350D, 5 minute exposure with a Canon EF 85mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz or visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

Moody Sky.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Apr 29 01:44:01 2006 UTC

This threatening sky provided a moody back-drop for New Zealand's largest garden ornament - Stonehenge Aotearoa. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/250th second exposure with a 20mm lens @ f-3.8, Kodak Elite Chrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Stonehenge Sunset.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Apr 29 01:21:01 2006 UTC

One year on from the grand opening, a reunion party was held at the Stonehenge Aotearoa astronomy park outside Carterton, New Zealand. The evening was cloudy, but presented pleasant vistas all the same. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/125th second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-4.5, Fuji Provia 400F slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

November 8, 2004 (0806 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Apr 27 10:17:01 2006 UTC

As evening twilight slowly began to fade above Ocean Beach, Hawke's Bay, this blue ray reached up to a height of 80 degrees! This would turn out to the first of three successive nights of auroras. Photo details: Minolta camera, 15 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

November 8, 2004 (0808 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Apr 27 10:02:01 2006 UTC

These bright rays persisted right through evening twilight with most of the activity in the south-west quarter of the sky. Photo details: Minolta camera, 35 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

November 8, 2004 (0815 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Apr 27 07:37:01 2006 UTC

This was a lovely aurora, with soft pastel colours and blue topped rays. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

November 09, 2004 (1042 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Apr 27 07:22:01 2006 UTC

The second night of auroras started with promise, but the show didn't last long. A subtle auroral glow adds some pink to this sky-scape. Photo details: Minolta camera, 19 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

November 10, 2004 (0850 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Apr 27 07:06:01 2006 UTC

The third night of auroras started off cloudy. However, there was just enough of a break in the weather to capture this long lived ray. Photo details: Minolta camera, 90 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Compass Of The Southern Sky.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Jul 4 08:26:01 2007 UTC

Constructed by volunteer labor over a period of 18 months, Stonehenge Aotearoa is a fully working star compass. Positioned outside Carterton, New Zealand, it is designed for the purpose of science education, in particular, the mechanics of the solar system. The main Ring is 30 meters in diameter and consists of 24 pillars topped with lintels. Its features include six heel-stones for marking solstice and equinox dates, a five meter tall obelisk and an analemma. At the central point lays a brass plaque, with an inscription reading: "These standing stones, these stars, configure the compass of Earth and the heavens." And that they do with amazing accuracy... For more information visit http://www.skyhigh-photography.com Photo details: Minolta camera. Fuji Provia 400F slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Double Feature.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Apr 15 09:52:01 2006 UTC

January 30, 2005 was a typical summers day In the Wairarapa. Typical except for this beautiful 22 degree halo and circum horozontal arc that appeared around mid-day. I would have missed the sight if it were not for Ian Cooper phoning me from Palmerston North, where he had seen it. Thanks Ian, I owe you one. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/500th second exposure with a 20mm lens @ f-16, polarizing filter. Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

iridescent cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Apr 15 09:22:01 2006 UTC

Here in Hawke's Bay, the prevailing westerly winds often produce long, high altitude rotor clouds. These clouds are commonly made of tiny ice crystals which can, when conditions are right, produce lovely iridescence. November 20, 2004 was no different, except that these were some of the brightest I have seen, so out came the camera... Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/500th second exposure with a 200mm lens @ f-10, polarising filter. Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

Southern Jewels.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Dec 28 14:15:01 2007 UTC

This image shows some of the southern sky's most recognizable features. At left are the two-pointers, the brighter of which (Alpha Centauri) is the closest star to our solar system. At centre is the Southern Cross (Crux) and a dark nebula, known as the Coal Sack. At right is the Carina nebula, containing the massive binary stars of Eta Carina. All this is set within the southern milky way. Photo details: Canon 350D, 60 second exposure with a 35mm lens, ISO 800 @ f-2.8. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. For more images, visit my website: http://www.skyhigh-photography.com

C/2002 T7 LINEAR

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Apr 14 06:15:01 2006 UTC

It turned out that my only decent chance to photograph T7 was on April 30th, wile it was still in the dawn sky... The comet rose about 1 1/2 hours before sunrise, and was almost exactly on the ecliptic. Unfortunately for me, that morning produced the brightest zodiacal light that I have ever seen. This washed out a lot of the faint features, but I still managed to capture several degrees of tail, and a faint anti-tail in this frame. Photo details: Minolta camera, 18 minute exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at gramy@globe.net.nz

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