Moonrise at Andoya

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Mar 3 03:57:01 2006 UTC

The moon rises from the southeast horizon into a sky filled with aurora. This was the evening of February 16, 2006 on the Island of Andoya,Norway. Photo : 38mm lens 6x7cm medium format Kodak E200 film Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Laser Beams in My Dreams

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Mar 3 03:31:01 2006 UTC

This image shows the aurora in the southern sky with Orion peeking over the mountains. If you look closely you can see the twin beams of green laser light from the ALOMAR observatory on Andoya Island, Norway. I took this shot from the rocket range near Andenes using a 6x7 cm medium format camera and Kodak E200film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Turbulant Sky

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 23:39:01 2006 UTC

It was a lot of fun taking shots from this final leg of my journey to Norway and back. This leg, on the early Morning of February 21, 2006, was from Anchorage to Homer in a Dehavlin twin Otter. There was a lot of wind and it was very turbulent. Most of the wise folks had stayed on the ground and it was only myself and a young Russian that had ventured into the sky on this particular flight. The aurora is actually visible as a faint arc to the extreme right of this panorama put togeather from a shot of the interior of the plane and one of the exterior looking out the window as we bounced along over Sterling and Soldotna, Alaska a little before 5:00 a.m. local time. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora and Moon on the Road to Glory

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 22:04:01 2006 UTC

The view from the airplane was simply stunning. Here was the full moon blazing away and the aurora borealis. I wasn't sure about being on the south side of the Airbus but at 70 degrees north or so it was perfect. The auroral oval was well to the south so this worked out rather nicely. I pressed the lens of my 35mm to the window and shot frame after frame using experience to judge the length of exposure. I wasn't sure if they would work from a moving airplane at all but I have learned to take the shot anyhow - something is better than nothing. This is about 1:00 a.m. local time somewhere north of Hudson's Bay and on the way towards Greenland. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Wing Walking at 34,000 feet

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 21:42:01 2006 UTC

You know how sometimes it seems that the aurora is so close that you can touch it? Well this one seemed to be walking right on the wing of the Airbus. This is looking south somewhere near Baffin Island with the moon a blazing full. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora and moon at 34,000 feet

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 21:27:01 2006 UTC

Here's yet another shot from the window of the airplane taken somewhere north of Hudson's Bay Canada in the early hours of February 15, 2006. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora from 34,000 feet

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 21:08:01 2006 UTC

This shot of the aurora borealis and the nearly full moon is taken from 34,000 feet over Baffin Island at about 75 degrees north latitude. The view is looking south out of the window of a Scandanavian Air Airbus at about 1:00 a.m. local time on February 15, 2006. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora over Booster Bay

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 19:16:01 2006 UTC

Here is a shot of the nordleys over Booster Bay at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway located at 69.2 degrees N. latitude in the heart of the auroral zone. This image was acquired using a home-built 6x7cm medium format camera and Kodak E100G film on the night of February 16 -17 around midnight. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

First image Booster bay

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 2 08:30:01 2006 UTC

This would be the first of several images I wouldl like to share. It is taken from Andoya , Norway looking in the general direction of home. Note that many directions look like home when you are this far from it. Got whale? Copyright (c) 2006 Dennis C. Anderson night Trax Photography www.auroradude.com

Glowing Summit at Augustine Volcano

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 8 21:33:01 2006 UTC

This is an image of the glowing summit of Augustine Volcano during a lava dome building phase. It was taken at 2:00 a.m. the morning of January 17, 2006. It is a 5 minute exposure by moonlight with a 6x6 camera and 400mm lens. The volcano, located about 75 miles SW of Homer, Alaska, erupted explosively at around 8:00 a.m. on this morning with a spectacular show of fireworks and has been in a continuous phose of eruption ever since. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Augustine Sunset

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jan 20 00:30:01 2006 UTC

Augustine Volcano is seen here shortly after sunset steaming into the night. The volcano has since erupted several times. The ash and haze certainly inhibits viewing the night sky. (c) copyright Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Augustine Volcano

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Dec 29 22:30:01 2005 UTC



It seems that there is never a dull moment living in Alaska. We have several active volcanos. This one, located about 65 miles SW of here (near Homer), has recently began to produce stam and minor ash eruptions and is possibly on the brink of a major eruption. I used my wife's little digital camera at the eyepiece of my 11x80 binoculars to capture this image on December 27, 2005.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Crepuscular Rays

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Dec 29 22:16:01 2005 UTC



A nice display of crepuscular rays is visible from our perch outside of Homer, Alaska near the winter solstice. This view is looking south.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Anti-crepuscular Christmas

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Dec 29 22:01:01 2005 UTC



Not long after our late Christmas dawn a beautiful display of anticrepuscular rays is seen in this pano stretching from west to north. I used photoshop to stitch three digital images in creating this pano.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

The Beauty Above

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Oct 24 17:53:01 2005 UTC

A spectacular crowning aurora is captured in the sky above Homer, Alaska on the night of October 28-29, 2003. I used a 6x6 medium format camera equipped with a 30mm fish-eye lens to record the phenomenon on film. The image spans 120 degrees from side to side and 180 degrees diagonally. It is only with such extreme wide-angle lenses that the aurora might begin to be captured in its full glory while it is filling the whole sky. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

A Blast From the Past

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Oct 23 20:15:01 2005 UTC

When things are quiet on the aurora front, or I'm snowed in, it gives me a chance to go through images from the past that I had skipped over. Here's an eerie crowning shot from the night of October 28-29, 2003. A red devil seems to eminate from the pentagram of stars containing Algol "to ancient Arabs-the demon star". This pentagram also makes up the head of the slain Medeussa in the constellation of Perseus. To look at this image it is easy to imagine why red auroras could make so many cultures uneasy. I used a 6x6 medium format camera and 30mm fish-eye lens to capture the scene on film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Virga at Sunset

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Sep 30 23:27:01 2005 UTC

A nice example of virga, precipitation that evaporates before it reaches the surface, seen at sunset from our deck in Homer Alaska this week. Kinda look like big jelly fish. copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Sun Pillar and Crepuscular rays

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Sep 28 03:09:01 2005 UTC

A couple atmospheric phenomenon that made for a nice sunset on winter solstice 2004. Taken from our deck near Homer, Alaska looking SSW at the end of a short day. (c) copyright Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

White Night

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Sep 25 18:29:01 2005 UTC

The stars of winter constellations are seen above the southern horizon and the bright moon is at left in this fish-eye view of wintertime Alaska. It is late January along the Gulkana River just south of the central Alaska Range. I used a 30mm lens that projects an image circle about 3-1/2 inches in diameter onto 4x5 film. The view extends 180 degrees in all directions - from East to West and fron straight overhead to the legs of the tripod below. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Rays of Violet

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Sep 25 19:13:01 2005 UTC

Beautiful tall rays of violet light reach above the green aurora and far into space as seen from near Homer, Alaska in the wee hours of August 10, 2005. Our space shuttle had landed a couple days earlier and commander Eileen Collins commented on the beauties of space flight: "We saw the southern lights at night. In fact we flew right through the aurora!" Can you only imagine.....? Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

A Colorful Night

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Sep 12 06:10:01 2005 UTC

The sky is aglow with color on this short August 10, 2005 night as viewed from near Homer, Alaska. The flickering aurora was sporting its familiar green as well as a blue-violet which was found on tall rays reaching high above the Earth's shadow into direct sunlight. The northern horizon was painted with warm color as ice crystals in high-altitude noctiluscent clouds reflected sunlight that was then filtered through a thick layer of smoke from summer forest fires still raging in the interior. The familiar "Big Dipper" is seen at top left in this wide-angle view using a 6x7 medium-format camera and 38mm lens on Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Green Spiral

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Aug 18 09:10:01 2005 UTC



An interesting small spiral feature is seen here embeded in the green aurora as seen in the eastern sky early August 10, 2005. I have seen a few of these but not very often. I used a 6x9 medium-format camera and 50mm lens to capture it on film. The planet Mars is at right in this wide-angle view. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Summer Time Blues

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Sep 25 18:57:01 2005 UTC

Tall rays of blue-violet light light are seen here in the western sky near Homer, Alaska on the early morning of August 10, 2005. This special emission from nitrogen molecules can be difficult for our eyes to see as they are not very sensitive in this part of the spectrum at night. I was just barely able to see the color myself on this occasion. Film does not have our limitations however and is able to record it easily. If the emissions are bright enough, we too can see it vividly but these are rare occasions indeed. I used a 6x7 medium-format camera and 38mm wide-angle lens to capture this scene on Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"Smoke Screen"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 17 21:50:02 2005 UTC



The sun is seen at the upper left here mostly obscured by a thick cloud of smoke from a run-away forest fire located about 10 miles away. This shot,looking over Cook Inlet from the Lower Kenai Peninsula, was taken in late April as the large fire broke out even before the start of the "official" fire season in Alaska. The fire raged out of control for days as there were few firefighters and less equipment availible this early in the season. With a lot of luck and a little help - in the form of rain - it was eventually brought under control and suppressed but it was just the beginning of another busy season for the fire crews.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"Noctiluscent Dawn"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 17 21:19:01 2005 UTC



The aurora was no longer visible as the approaching dawn had wiped out the last traces but the much brighter noctiluscent clouds were still ablaze as seen here in the northeast, from near Homer, Alaska, at around 4:10 a.m. local time. I used a 6x6medium format camera with an 80mm lens and Fuji provia 100F for this last shot before heading to the barn. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Twilight's Last Gleaming

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Nov 3 21:27:01 2005 UTC

At last, darkness is here! This August 13th morning will probably be the last time that I see any twilight at local midnight (2:00 a.m.) here at 61 degrees north for the summer but it can be a magical time when the direct sunlight hitting the upper parts of the aurora causes nitrogen molocules to produce a beautiful blue-violet coloring. I took this shot from Lower Summit Lake on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula about 1-1/2 hours drive south of Anchorage using a 6x9 medium-format camera with a 50mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100G film.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctiluscent Clouds and the Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Aug 18 02:51:01 2005 UTC

As dawn approached, the aurora began to fade rapidly but the rare display of noctiluscent clouds had increased in intensity. The sun slid around eastward below the northern Horizon until it had reached a point where the geometry was perfect. This allowed its bright light to be reflected from the water ice crystals that make up these mysterious high-altitude clouds. I used a 6x7 medium format camera and 75mm lens with Kodak E100 VS film to capture the colorful scene on August 10, 2005 at about 3:30 a.m. local time. (c) Copyright Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Darkness Falls

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Sep 26 07:51:01 2005 UTC

As the long days of our short northern summer begin to give way to the returning darkness, the auroras finally become visible again. I photographed this nice bit of activity on the morning of August 11, 2005 from near Homer, Alaska. What looks like a sunset on the horizon is actually a display of rare noctiluscent clouds made reddish by smoke in the air. A 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm lens and Kodak E100VS film were used for the photo. (c) Copyright Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

On the Edge of Darkness

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Aug 18 02:25:01 2005 UTC

August is an exciting time as darkness begins to return to 60 degrees north and with it comes the aurorae. Here, tall rays reach up out of the Earth's shadow into direct sunlight and are transformed into a beautiful shade of violet. Below, a green aurora dances in the treetops while a rare display of noctiluscent clouds graces the horizon. They are painted reddish by the smoke of this summer's forest fires. I took this shot a little past 2:00 a.m. local time on August 10, 2005 during the darkest part of our short night using a 6x7 medium format camera equipped with a 75mm lens and Kodak E100G film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Lunar Halo

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun May 8 10:08:01 2005 UTC



On this crisp January night in early 2005 there was a distinct halo around the moon which was caused by high altitude ice crystals. I used a 30mm fisheye lens on a 6x6 cm medium format camera to catch the spectacle.

copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.aurordude.com

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