The Face of Odin

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Mar 1 20:15:01 2005 UTC

A portrait of the Viking god Odin is brought on the wings of the Vaklyries, messengers of Odin, during this colorful crowning aurora witnessed on the early morning of January 17, 2005. Ursa Major, The Great Bear above, and Leo the Lion below, are included in this wide angle view of the heavens taken with a 6x7 camera equipped with a 38mm wide-angle lens. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"PURPLE CROWN"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Oct 11 19:43:01 2007 UTC

On the early morning of January 17, 2005 the aurora was blazing overhead. This in itself is not unusual but what was unusual was the beautiful violet coloring. It had started in the west a few minutes earlier and was now overhead filling the sky with beautiful light. Usually these colors are very hard for us to see and are more often captured by the film which is more sensitive to this area of the spectrum. This display was exceptional and was vivid even to the naked eye. I used a home-built medium-fomat 6x7cm. camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens to capture the spectacle on film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

"BLUE ANGEL"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Oct 11 20:07:01 2007 UTC

The phenomenal blue-violet aurora of January 17, 2005 was slowly moving eastward as seen here near 6:30 a.m. local time. It would be around for another hour or so gracing the eastern pre-dawn sky until twilight finally erased the last traces by 8:00 a.m. This shot was acquired with a 6x7cm. home-built medium-format camera with a 38mm wide-angle lens from near Homer, Alaska. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

"COLORED SKY OVER ILLIAMNA"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Oct 11 20:29:01 2007 UTC

In this view to the west, we see the beginning of the beautiful blue-violet show of January 17, 2003. Illiamna volcano is seen off in the distance in this wide-angle image obtained with a 6x7cm. home-built medium-format camera. Green oxygen emissions rise from about 50 to 100 miles and are topped by red oxygen emissions. These start around 100 miles and reach up to 200 or more miles high. Above this, the aurora is bathed in direct sunlight from the approaching dawn. It is this sunlight that coaxes the blue and violet hues from nitrogen molocules in a process known as resonance scattering. This type of emission can reach 600 or more miles above the Earth. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

12 Hours of Stars Trailing

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Feb 12 00:24:01 2005 UTC

The 24-hour clock that is our Earth had completed exactly 1/2 revolution as recorded by the trailing of the stars in this 12-hour exposure taken during one of our long winter nights. The camera was protected from any stray light by its placement in a spruce grove on our property outside of Homer, Alaska. The aurora acted up only a little during the long exposure and is seen as the greenish glow in the bottom part of the sky. I used a 45mm lens at f/22 on 6x9 medium-format Fuji 100F film. I had started the exposure on January 10th, 2005 at 7:30 p.m. and ended it at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of the 11th. (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

The Way Home

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Feb 11 11:01:01 2005 UTC

After six hours of driving through blizzard conditions, complete with flying hamsters, snow snakes, and Star Wars effects, it was a delight to see the lights of Homer (overexposed) reflected off the low clouds ahead. It was even more of a delight to see a few stars and of course - the aurora borealis. I was only five miles from home after five days away but it would wait another couple hours as I watched the sky flickering wildly for one and then labored for another to free my loaded van from the deep snow that had accumulated in my absence. - November 8, 2004 Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"BLUE RIDGE"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Oct 11 18:53:01 2007 UTC

Beautiful blue and violet rays reach high into the eastern sky just before dawn at 7:30 a.m local time on the morning of January 17, 2005. This was only the second time that I had seen an intense blue aurora visually. These emissions are usually pretty feeble and escape the detection of our eyes which are not very sensitive to this area of the spectrum at night. The emissions are the result of the stimulation of nitrogen molocules by direct sunlight. These twilight auroras have been measured at up to 600 miles altitude or more, high above the Earth and its shadow. I used a 6x9cm. home-bnuilt camera and 50mm lens to record the rare display from Diamond Ridge near Homer, Alaska. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: aurorade@acxsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Red Sky East

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 9 22:22:01 2005 UTC

After a beautiful overhead crowning, the bright red display moved to the eastern sky as seen from near Homer, Alaska January 17, 2005. I used a 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm lens and Kodak E100G film to capture the vivid color. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Spirit of Ecstacy

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Nov 1 02:01:01 2005 UTC

A colorful winged creature approaches from the west at about 4:00 a.m. January 17, 2005. Photographed with a 6x7 medium format camera equipped with a 38mm ultra-wide angle lens on Kodak E100G film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Bird of Paradise

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 9 21:43:01 2005 UTC

Another image from the early morning crowning aurora of January 17, 2005. This time resembling an exotic Bird of Paradise. I used a 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm ultra-wide angle lens on Kodak E100G film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Red Bird

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Feb 9 21:30:01 2005 UTC

On the early morning of January 17, 2005 a rare bird came again to Homer. As he flapped his mammoth wings overhead the sky was all aglow with red. Way too many missed it alas, asleep in bed I fear. I used a 6x7 medium format camera with a 38mm ultra-wide lens and Kodak E100G film for this portrait of this spectacular crowning aurora. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Denali Dawn

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Jan 26 01:09:01 2005 UTC

The aurora, latin for dawn, bridges the gap between night and day in this early morning scene from Denali State Park, Alaska. While stars are still visible the 20,000 foot Alaska Range is already catching the warm light of an approaching day. This October 17, 2003 image is a panoramic crop from a 6x9 medium format original taken on a 50mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Darkness Falls

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Jan 23 00:26:01 2005 UTC

Finally! After a long summer of light darkness returns to Alaska's Kenai Peninsula and with it the season of the magical northern lights begins. Even though it is local midnight, we see the northern horizon still aglow with the light of a midnight sun now just a few degrees below the horizon. For the North Slope (of Alaska) the sun has just set for the first time since early May and the aurora season is still a month away. But now, at this 60 degree North latitude, I can finally bask in its soothing light once again. This panoramic image is created from two photographs taken with a 6x9 medium format camera from the beach a Deep Creek on August 7th, 2004. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

A Purple Ray of Light

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Jan 20 20:20:01 2005 UTC

A tall ray of the aurora reaches up above the Earth's shadow and is thransformed into a beautiful purple by the interaction of direct sunlight. While this color is elusive to human vision it is usually vivid on film. I was barely able to perceive the hue with my eyes. Venus, at left, adds to the scene and Orion at the right flanks the Russian church located at Ninilchik, Alaska. The original was captured on 6x9 medium-format camera with a 50mm lens and Fuji Provia 100. Copyright (c) 2004 Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Denali Wide

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Jan 20 05:21:01 2005 UTC

The aurora borealis blazes above a moonlit scene in the Central Alaska Range featuring 20,320 foot tall Mount McKinley as its crown gem. The usually-frozen Chulitna river still flows liquid on a mild January morning. This panoramic image is cropped from a medium format 6x9 original taken with a 50mm wide-angle lens and Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

A Blue Dawn

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Jan 19 08:39:01 2005 UTC

While not a particularly spectacular aurora, this gentle arc spanned the gap from Vega above the Russian church in the northwest past the "Big Dipper", at center, and to the planet Venus in the east. I was excited at the sight though since this last fall was especially hard on aurora viewing with an over abundance of cloudiness. The panoramic image is created from three separate photos taken with a 38mm lens on 6x7 medium format Fuji 100F from Ninilchik on September 14, 2004. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Reflections at Twenty Mile

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Jan 19 02:43:01 2005 UTC

A firey aurora rises above Alaska's Chugach mountains and is reflected in the back waters of Twenty Mile River. This panoramic crop is from a 6x9 medium format original taken with a 50mm wide-angle lens during the evening display of October 30, 2003. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Black Aurora 30 January 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Feb 7 21:37:02 2004 UTC



This is an unusual feature here that I believe could be what is known as "black aurora". Black aurora is not actually an aurora but is just the opposite. It is the absence of aurora. The light producing portion of the aurora is charged with negative ions. The "black" aurora is believed to be positively charged. This unusual feature was seen to move ahead of the bright portion at left and seemed to sweep the aurora at right out of its way as it moved west to east (left to right). This aurora was accompanied by very strange noises on the AM radio. I took this photo from about 30 miles northeast of Tok in East Central Alaska along the Taylor or "Top of the World" highway. (Not much of a highway as it is dirt/gravel for most of the way.)

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Proton Arc 24 January 2004

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Feb 6 04:54:01 2004 UTC



This image was acquired using a 35mm camera and 8mm circular fisheye lens from near Homer, Alaska. The prominent reddish streak in this all sky view, looking up and with south at the bottom, is of the proton arc that I had observed at about 09:15 UT on January 24, 2004. Note that the arc is entirely independent from the "normal" glow of the aurora seen in the northern sky. The stars have trailed during the 5-minute long exposure that was required to record the faint arc.

Copyright (c) 2004 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Breakup at 40 Below

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jan 30 08:30:01 2004 UTC



The last morning of 1999 brought a beautiful aurora and bitter cold. I was out all night in Denali Park, Alaska struggling to keep warm and thought of the two Russian climbers who had attempted a winter ascent of Mount McKinley. They too were struggling to keep warm in minus 50 to minus 60 temperatures and had bogged down in the tremendous snowfall unable to make their lofty goal. They spent three weeks in their tent eating valuable supplies before calling it off. I too could feel the bite this morning as the air temperature plunged to minus 44 (F.) A light wind added to the effect as I struggled with broken film and frozen cameras. In the morning I was turning into a gas station at the Talkeetna Junction and almost ended up in a snow bank. The cold had made my steering so stiff it was all I could do to wrestle my jeep safely off the road. Was it worth it - You know it!

Copyright (c)1999 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Multiple Arcs at Kluane October 1996

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Jan 29 16:24:01 2004 UTC



This image is a good example of multiple arcs. They are seen here in the northern sky over Kluane Lake Yukon Territories, Canada on a moonlit night in late October 1996. These arcs are glowing with the light from the common green oxygen emissions.

Copyright (c) 1996 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acslaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Proton Arc September 1999

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Jan 29 08:55:02 2004 UTC



This proton arc is probably the brightest example I have ever witnessed. The arc was first noticed overhead stretching from northwest to east around 10:00 pm local time and now had drifted about 30 degrees south of the zenith about an hour later. It was now scribing an arc west to southeast. The "rosy" color of the proton arc is very prominent along with a slightly "braided" look in this view of the southeast sector. The "main body" of the aurora is to the left (north) of the arc and was also drifting southward. It seemed to be closing the gap and almost catching up to the arc. This photo was taken from Homer, Alaska using a 21mm f/2 lens and Fuji's 800 speed film. Copyright (c) 1999 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Proton Arc 28 August 1997

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Jan 28 18:24:02 2004 UTC



This image is a good example of a fairly bright proton arc. These usually faint, featureless arcs are also known by the name "hydrogen arc". Both names are derived from the fact that they are believed to be created by a high speed stream of particles rich in protons or hydrogen nuclei on the outside edge of the Van Allen belts. They will appear as a diffuse arc separated from the main discrete body of the aurora. The main discrete body of this aurora can be seen to the right (north) in this view looking west from near Homer, Alaska.

Copyright (c) 1997 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com


Aurora From Chicken II 29 January 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jan 23 01:58:04 2004 UTC



Here's another shot from Chicken, Alaska looking northwest at a classic red over green aurora. This was near the end of my two-week winter camping trip and one of over a thousand images that I had acquired. The image was shot on Fuji 400F using a 6x9 medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens.

Copyright (c)2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora From Chicken 29 January 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jan 23 01:23:01 2004 UTC



Jupiter was the prominent "star" the east this evening and was shining brightly here as the aurora was gathering strength. It was 0 degrees at sunset but now, at 8:00 p.m. the temperature had dropped to minus 22 (F.). An arctic front was approaching and by morning the air temperature had fallen to minus 37 - balmy for an area that could easily have been minus 50 to minus 70 at this time of the year. Usually, the road to Chicken, Alaska is closed for the winter but mild conditions had allowed it to be plowed the day before in order that gold mining equipment could be delivered to Eagle, located on up the road. I used a 6x9 medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens and loaded with Fuji 400F for this exposure from 64 degrees north latitude.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"DENALI REVISITED"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Oct 11 18:31:02 2007 UTC

The aurora borealis shines brightly over "Denali" ,more commonly known as Mount McKinley, which at 20,320 feet is Norht America's tallest peak. Even though this mountain, bathed in bright moonlight, seems to touch the aurora this is just an illusion. The green auroras actually occur many miles above in the near-space environment beginning around 50 miles altitude and reaching up to 100 miles or more. I used a 6x7cm. home-built medium-format camera to record the scene from Alaska's Denali State Park on January 19, 2003. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photography Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Summer and Winter Solstice Panoramas

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Jan 17 23:06:01 2004 UTC



I just finished a project as part of a new exhibit in the local museum. It consisted of two images depicting the sun's path through the sky at summer solstice and a comparison at winter solstice. Both images are stitched together from 12 separate images and each form a 360 degree panorama centered on South. The summer sun at Homer, Alaska (latitude approx. 60 degrees north) is above the horizon for about 18 hours rising in the NNE and setting in the NNW. At this time there is 24 hour light as the sun never gets more than a few degrees below the northern horizon. The winter sun, on the other hand, is only up for about 6 hours rising in the SSE and setting in the SSW barely getting 7 degrees above the southern horizon at local noon.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Orion Over the House

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Jan 17 20:42:01 2004 UTC



The bright winter constellation of Orion is prominent in the south as seen from our new home on Diamond Ridge near Homer, Alaska. Moonlight was strong in this November 15, 2003 early morning scene. I shot this 35-second exposure with a 35mm camera and 28mm lens using Kodak E100VS film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Livingroom Astronomer December 20, 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Jan 11 13:32:01 2004 UTC



With winter solstice at hand, the nights are very long indeed. Cold is predominant as well, so, I find it nice to sometimes watch the night sky from the warmth and comfort of one's own livingroom. The green sky-glow of a faint and diffuse aurora brightens the horizon of this 1-1/2 hour exposure looking southwest from near Homer, Alaska. Sirius is the bright star at bottom left, Orion is setting at center, and bright Saturn dominates above. I used a 20mm lens on 35mm on Kodak E100VS for this exposure of the stars trailing through the windows.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

December 5, 2003 Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Jan 11 10:43:01 2004 UTC



The aurora shows tall colorful rays, bright enough to cut through the light of a full moon, in this shot looking north from Diamond Ridge, Homer, Alaska. I used a 6x9 cm. medium-format camera with a 50mm lens and Fuji Provia 100 to record the well-lit scene.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

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