Aurora. November 8th 2004 (0808 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Nov 11 10:30:01 2004 UTC

These bright rays persisted right through evening twilight. On this night, most of the activity was in the south west quarter of the sky. Photo details: Minolta camera, 35 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

 

Additional Images by this Photographer:

Planetary Trio.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Aug 6 22:08:01 2005 UTC

The evening of June 6th, 2005 was lovely not only for its sun-set. The three jewels of Saturn (upper left), Venus (centre), and Mercury (bottom) added to the spectacle as they neared their closest approach. Photo details: Minolta camera, 3 second exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Fuji Provia 400F slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au.

Stonehenge Aotearoa.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Mon Feb 7 09:09:01 2005 UTC

This modern-day stone circle is situated at the Stonehenge Aotearoa Astronomy Centre, Near Carterton, New Zealand. Built by members of the Phoenix Astronomical Society, it is intended to be used as an educational tool, to show how the heavens were, and still can be used for navigation and time keeping. The official opening is on February 12, 2005. See this link for more details: http://www.astronomynz.org.nz/stonehenge/stonehenge.htm. Photo details: Minolta camera, 47 minute exposure with a 20mm lens @ f-3.8, Fuji Provia 400F slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. November 8th 2004 (0806 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Nov 13 22:48:01 2004 UTC

This image was taken from Ocean Beach, near Hastings, New Zealand. As evening twilight slowly began to fade, this blue ray reached up to a height of 80 degrees! This would turn out to the first of three successive nights of auroras. Photo details: Minolta camera, 15 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. November 8th 2004 (0815 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 16 05:02:01 2004 UTC

This was the loveliest aurora I have ever seen. The southern cross can be seen upside down in the right hand side of this image, but at some times it almost vanished in the bright glow of the storm. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1 minute exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer.Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. November 8th 2004 (0951 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Nov 11 09:57:01 2004 UTC

The power of this display surprised me. These rays were appearing due west of me in the constellation Saggitarius. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. November 9th 2004 (1042 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Nov 13 22:56:01 2004 UTC

This image was taken from south of Paki Paki, near Hastings, New Zealand. The second night of auroras started with promise, but the show didn't last long. A subtle auroral glow adds some pink to this sky-scape. Photo details: Minolta camera, 19 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. November 10th 2004 (0850 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Nov 13 23:03:01 2004 UTC

This image was taken from Mt Erin Road, Hastings, New Zealand. The third night of auroras started off cloudy. However, there was just enough of a break in the weather to capture this long lived ray. Photo details: Minolta camera, 90 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer.Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Small Magellanic Cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Nov 17 08:24:01 2004 UTC

While similar in size to the Large Magellanic Cloud, the SMC appears smaller and fainter, due to its greater distance. It resides approximately 195,000 light years away in the constellation of Tucana. A reasonable sized telescope will reveal a myriad of wonders, including one of the best globular clusters in the whole sky. Known as 47 Tucana, this glob contains in the region of 100,000 stars and can easily be resolved. Photo details: Minolta camera, 42 minute exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Antares.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 16 05:09:01 2004 UTC

On the border between Scorpio and Ophiuchus, is one of the most colourful and exotic parts of our galaxy; the Rho Ophiuchus star clouds. This region is rich in heavy elements produced inside massive stars, very similar to the red giant, Antares. The colours come from a mixture of reflection and emission nebula. Usually Emission nebulae are red, due to hydrogen, but here there are such high levels of oxygen and nitrogen (and others) that the clouds glow like a celestial rainbow. Antares is further adding to the mix, by producing massive amounts of carbon. Photo details: Minolta camera, 30 minute exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Large Magellanic Cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Nov 17 08:33:01 2004 UTC

Described in some books as a 'barred-spiral' galaxy, the LMC is the tattered remains of a once beautiful spiral. Now containing about 10 billion stars, it may once have been three or four times as massive. The lost material now forms part of our own Milky-Way, as well as a vast stream of stars and gas, reaching in a loop between the two. One day, the LMC will be swallowed by the Milky-Way, but until then, it makes a truely lovely neighbour. Photo details: Minolta camera, 30 minute exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Iridescent Cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sat Aug 6 22:38:01 2005 UTC

Here in New Zealand, the prevailing westerly winds often produce long, thin rotor clouds. These clouds are often made of tiny ice crystals, which can, when conditions are right, produce lovely iridescent clouds. November 20, 2004 was no different, except that these were some of the brightest I have seen, so out came the camera... Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/500th second exposure with a 200mm lens @ f-10, polarising filter. Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Inside The Key-Hole.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 16 10:43:01 2004 UTC

The glowing pink clouds of the Carina Nebula reside more than six thousand light years away, in the constellation Carina, the Keel. Home and birth-place of the massive star Eta Carina, this part of heaven once laid claim to the title of the second brightest star in our sky. This happened during the nineteenth century, when Eta Carina, weighing approximately 140 solar masses, underwent a spectacular brightening. It has long since fallen back to below naked eye brightness. However, in the near future, it may regain that title. It is now classed as a cataclysmic variable, and the past decade has seen mysterious changes in its brightness and colour. The inner part of this nebula is known as the Key-Hole; very appropriate when we think of the secrets locked inside. Mysteries aside, we do know that the star is doomed, and one day, possibly soon, it will flare bright enough to cast strong shadows for a long period. Photo details: Minolta camera, 28 minute exposure with a 135mm lens and a 2 X converter @ f-4.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Sun-Dog and Thunder.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Nov 17 08:33:01 2004 UTC

The heat of a Hawke's Bay summer produced this spectacular thunder head on January 3, 2004. The anvil stretched out a remarkably long way in the prevailing westerly wind. As the sun lowered itself into some distant cloud, a sun-dog appeared beneath the anvil, and for a while, was almost as bright as the sun itself. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/500th second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

C/2002 T7 (LINEAR).

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Sun Nov 28 05:15:01 2004 UTC

It turned out that my only decent chance to photograph T7 was on May 1st, wile it was still in the dawn sky... The comet rose about 1 1/2 hours before sunrise, and was almost exactly on the ecliptic. Unfortunately for me, that morning produced the brightest zodiacal light that I have ever seen. This washed out a lot of the faint features, but I still managed to capture several degrees of tail, and a faint anti-tail in this frame. Photo details: Minolta camera, 9 minute exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Stardate Sunset.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Tue Nov 16 05:16:01 2004 UTC

Stardate is an annual star-party held outside Hastings, New Zealand. This spectacular sunset was the herald for a good nights viewing on January 22nd of 2004. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1/15th second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 100 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Eclipse Montage - July 2000 Lunar Eclipse.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Nov 17 08:40:01 2004 UTC

This series of images was taken on July 16, 2000. Starting at 10:47 UTC and lasting until 17:04 UTC. This was dubbed as the "thousand year eclipse" because it was the longest lunar eclipse for a thousand years... Totality, when the entire moon was in shadow, lasted 1 hour and 47 minutes. During this time, the moon turned an eerie copper colour and looked more like Mars than our usual lunar neighbour. The eclipse was also accompanied by a beautiful display of meteors from three showers. Truly a night to remember. Photo details: The pics were taken east of Palmerton North, New Zealand, with a Minolta SLR camera @ prime focus through a home built 6" telescope. The exposures ranged from 1/250th to 1 second. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. I can be contacted at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Carina Nebula.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at eJ Jul 21 1010:44:01 2004 UTC

Near the famous Southern Cross, lies one of the most under-rated objects in the southern sky - The Carina Nebula. Perhaps one reason for this lack of prestige, is the fact that this beauty is positioned in one of the most dense parts of the Milky Way. There, it is surrounded by literally dozens of small star clusters and faint nebulae. This glowing pink cloud resides more than six thousand light years away, yet there is only one other nebula which is an easier naked-eye object; the great nebula in Orion. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 minute exposure with a 135mm lens @ f-3.5, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Golden Path.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2222:36:01 2004 UTC

The sun shows the way across the port of Napier. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1 second exposure with a 175mm zoom lens and a 2 times converter @ f-6, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Seaport Sunrise.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2222:28:01 2004 UTC

I rose early to try and catch the 2003 Leonids, but the only thing worth looking at was this stunning sunrise across the port of Napier. Photo details: Minolta camera, 1 second exposure with a 200mm zoom lens and a 2 times converter @ f-6, Kodak Elitechr ome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Mars Rising.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2222:23:01 2004 UTC

This image of Mars was taken from the Phoenix observatory outside Carterton, New Zealand, on July 26, 2003. As Mars approached opposition, it weaved its way through the constellation of Aquarius. There, it was framed by a water symbol, and in this image it is underlined by faint pink air-glow. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Clouds Of Magellan.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2222:44:01 2004 UTC

When the Portuguese explorer Magellan, ventured into the southern hemisphere, he noticed two strange blobs of light that lingered in the night sky. Unable to give an explanation of what they were, he simply called them clouds. They are now known as the clouds of Magellan. These objects are in fact our closest galactic neighbours, at between 170,000 and 195,000 light years distant. Each of these dwarf galaxies contains around 10 billion stars, and are popular targets for amateur telescopes. Beautiful as they are, they are also doomed; they are believed to be trapped by the Milky Way's gravity, and are destined to be assimilated into her. Photo details: Minolta camera, 11 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Galactic Neighbour - Large Magellanic Cloud.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2323:08:01 2004 UTC



Named after Portuguese explorer Magellan, the Large Magellanic Cloud is an easy target from New Zealand on any clear night. Many clusters and nebula fill the region, the most famous of which is known as the Tarantula - a massive glowing cloud filled with young, hot stars. In 1987 the light of a distant supernova shone out of this galaxy - the first naked eye event of this type for centuries. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 minute exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0805 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2323:15:01 2004 UTC



As twilight was fading to black, and with a three day old moon in the sky, I looked south and saw a faint, but definate pink glow illuminating the clouds. This got me excited - It never occured to me that aurora could be seen during twilight before. I took this image to see if my eyes had been teasing me... They weren't! It was the start of a night to remember. Photo details: Minolta camera, one minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0829 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at oJ Jul 26 0202:19:01 2004 UTC



After the twilight glows, there was a period of little activity. I feared that the show might whimper out. I needant have worried: At 0828 UTC the sky came to life like someone had switched a light on! The obvious red glow back lit some cloud that had gathered during the lull, showing the contrast between black and the vibrant colours of this aurora. Photo details: Minolta camera, 30 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0833 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 22 2323:20:01 2004 UTC



The evening continued to darken as the first real sign of rays peeked above the cloud tops. During this time the whole sky seemed to have a pink tinge. Photo details: Minolta camera, 30 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0839 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at rJ Jul 23 0000:23:02 2004 UTC



After the twilight glows, there was a period of little activity. I feared that the show might whimper out. I needant have worried: At 0828 UTC the sky came to life like someone had switched a light on! The obvious red glow back lit some cloud that had gathered during the lull, showing the contrast between black and the vibrant colours of this aurora. Photo details: Minolta camera, 30 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0842 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Oct 7 04:54:01 2004 UTC

At the height of the display, the south-western sky was ablaze with multicoloured rays. The yellowing near the horizon is the top edge of the green arc, rarely seen from this latitude (South 39.6 degrees). Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0845 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at rJ Jul 23 0000:28:01 2004 UTC



These blue/purple rays reached high into the sky as the display wore on. At left is the Southern Cross, with the bright pointer stars near top centre. Photo details: Minolta camera, 20 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Aurora. October 29th 2003 (0858 UTC)

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at rJ Jul 23 0000:33:01 2004 UTC



Near the end of the first hour things went quiet, except for this stubborn ray that lingered after display had paused. Photo details: Minolta camera, 20 second exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

South Celestial Pole.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Wed Nov 17 08:33:01 2004 UTC

Like the axel of a wheel, the Earth's poles are a point of rotation. In the Northern hemisphere, the North star, Polaris, gives a guide to the point directly above the Arctic. In the south, there is no such star. Down here, early navigators used a number of points in the sky, including the southern cross, to find their compass directions. Using these methods, the Polynesians sailed the mighty Pacific Ocean and eventually found their way to New Zealand, where this photo was taken from. Like water going down a plug-hole, the stars spiral the south celestial pole in this 20 minute exposure. The main exposure was 20 minutes, then the lens was covered for two minutes before being re-exposed for a further minute to show the individual stars. Photo details: Minolta camera, 20 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

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