Scorpio & Starbirth.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Fri Oct 8 05:11:01 2004 UTC

This image shows the constellation of Scorpio, embedded in the central hub of the Milky-way. The star-fields of Sagittarius are intertwined with massive clouds of dark gas and dust, clearly seen here. However, some of these clouds are not dark. Numerous pink and red patches signify areas of star-formation, where the cold hydrogen clouds have been ionised by the scorching radiation of hot, young stars. Photo details: Minolta camera, 10 minute exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Southern Jewels.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at oJ Jul 26 0202:31:01 2004 UTC



This image shows some of the southern sky's most stunning features. At left are the two-pointers, the brighter of which (Alpha Centauri) is the closest star to our solar system. At centre is the Southern Cross (Crux) and a dark nebula, known as the Coal-Sack. At right is the Key-hole nebula, containing the massive, unstable star, Eta Carina. All this is set within the southern milky way. This image was taken on July 26, 2003. Photo details: Minolta camera, 5 minute exposure with a 50mm lens @ f-1.7, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Middle-Earth.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at Thu Nov 25 10:10:01 2004 UTC

This image was taken on the morning of November 6, 2003. I was camping with a friend up in the Kaweka ranges, New Zealand. The night was frosty, with a near full moon. I got up at 4am local time, and saw the valley below full of fog, and just couldn't resist this shot. Photo details: Minolta camera, 40 second exposure with a 28mm lens @ f-2.8, Kodak Elitechrome 200 slide film. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Totality - July 2000 Lunar Eclipse.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at uJ Jul 20 2222:09:01 2004 UTC



This is one shot in a series, taken after midnight local time on the morning of July 16th, 2000. Starting at 10:47 UTC and lasting until 17:04 utc, this was dubbed as the "thousand year eclipse" because it was the longest lunar eclipse for a thousand years... Totality, when the entire moon was in shadow, lasted 1 hour and 47 minutes. During this time, the moon turned an eerie copper colour and looked more like Mars than our usual neighbour... The eclipse was also accompanied by a beautiful display of meteors from three showers. Truly a night to remember. The image was taken outside Palmerton North, New Zealand, with a Minolta SLR camera @ prime focus through a home built 6" telescope. 1 second exposure. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

Sunspot Group.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at oJ Jul 26 0202:36:01 2004 UTC



This sun spot group unleashed a powerful CME on March 30 2001, which impacted Earth's magnetic field the very next day, causing world-wide auroral storming. The picture was taken with a hand-held camera using my 6" telescope to project the image on a bit of card. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

New Zealand Aurora, March 2001.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at hJ Jul 15 2121:32:01 2004 UTC

This picture was taken on March 31 2001 from the middle of Hastings, New Zealand. A large sunspot group had unleashed a massive CME the day before, resulting in one of the best auroral displays for several years. For me, this was all new, as this was my very first one. (what a way to get started!) The photo location was inside the city itself, demonstrating the brightness of this display. Bright rays persisted for what seemed an eternity; well after I had finished my only roll of 100asa film... I have also submitted a picture of the spot group (taken the day before) which caused the disturbance. Image copyright to Graham Palmer. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

New Zealand Fire-Ball, July 7th, 1999.

Submitted by: Graham Palmer at oJ Jul 26 0202:36:01 2004 UTC



On the 7th of July 1999, at about 04:12 UT, A daylight fireball blazed across the North Island of New Zealand. Witnesses described a series of bright flashes, combined with the sound of explosions, as a one metre piece of debris, probably from the asteroid field, blazed in a fire-ball across the sky. Not all of it burned.. In some areas, many people said they even felt the ground shake... (confirmed by Seismographs) At the end of it all, a one hundred & eighty kilometre-long smoke trail was left drifting over the eastern half of the North Island. This image was taken about 45 minutes later, as the cloud drifted East over Hastings. I was unaware of the meteor, until I saw this amazing blue cloud. I took several photos and only later did I learn the truth of its origin. Contact me at skyhi_1972@yahoo.com.au

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