"INCREDIBLE JOURNEY Ocober 17, 2003"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Oct 28 20:02:01 2007 UTC

Tonight's intense breakup was complete with the most colorful nitrogen fringe I can remember. Purple, maroon, pink red and orange were vivid to the naked eye as the aurora achieved its greatest brilliance. This edging of color, visible on the lower border of the green bands, is caused by very energetic particles penetrating the atmosphere down to 35 or 40 miles in altitude where molecular nitrogen is coaxed into producing the beautiful hues as opposed to the oxygen greens which occur at 50 to 100 miles in altitude. I captured the moment on a 6x9 medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"NITROGEN FRINGE"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Oct 28 19:39:01 2007 UTC

Tonight's intense breakup was complete with the most colorful nitrogen fringe I can remember. Purple, maroon, pink red and orange were vivid to the naked eye as the aurora achieved its greatest brilliance. This edging of color, visible on the lower border of the green bands, is caused by very energetic particles penetrating the atmosphere down to 35 or 40 miles in altitude where molecular nitrogen is coaxed into producing the beautiful hues as opposed to the oxygen greens which occur at 50 to 100 miles in altitude. I captured the moment on a 6x9 medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"SPIRAL SKY October 16, 2003"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Oct 28 20:23:01 2007 UTC

After the intense breakup a few minutes earlier, a rare spiral feature appeared in the northwester sky over the Alaska Range as seen from near Talkeetna. I used a 6x9 medium format camera to record the phenomenon. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Night Trax Photoghraphy Contact at: auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit: www.auroradude.com

Breakup at Talkeetna

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Nov 8 20:04:01 2005 UTC

Wolves began howling as the aurora grew in strength and I could hear a loud chorus from half a dozen or more off in the woods in front of me. I could not contain my excitement either and had to answer with a hoot of my own! This incredible breakup is on the evening of October 16, 2003 at about 11:30 p.m. local time. It was the most intense of many waves of activity throughout this crystal clear night of viewing on which the aurora was visible from 8 p.m. in the evening until after 7 a.m. in the morning. This photo was taken from the Talkeetna, Alaska area and is looking Northwest towards the Central Alaska Range which includes Mount McKinley, North America's tallest peak. I used a medium format 6x9 camera and a 50mm lens to capture the wide angle view. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.aurordude.com

Dawn Comes Early

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Oct 10 01:48:01 2003 UTC



Dawn comes early to Alaska in this August 23, 2003 photo taken around 4:15 a.m. local time. The moon shines brightly and is accompanied by the planet Saturn while the aurora borealis puts on one last show as seen from Turnagain Pass on the Northern Kenai Peninsula. This is a 10 second exposure with a medium format camera equipped with a 75mm lens and Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com.

Moon Over Summit Lake

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Oct 10 01:25:03 2003 UTC



A bright moon hangs over the Kenai Mountains and is reflected in the calm waters of Summit Lake below while a faint aurora paints the sky. The familiar stars of Taurus shine brightly above the mountains at right in this August 23, 2003 photo taken around 3:00 a.m. local time. I used a medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens and Fuji Provia 400 film to capture the scene.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Turnagain Moon

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Oct 10 00:42:01 2003 UTC



The over exposed crescent moon shines brightly above an active auroral band as seen to the northeast from Turnagain Pass on the very Northern Kenai Peninsula about an hour out of anchorage. This shot, early in the aurora season, was taken about 3:45 a.m. on August 23, 2003 using a medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens and Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Two Rocks

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Sep 26 11:32:01 2003 UTC



As the incoming tide tried to float two massive boulders, the aurora gathered strength for yet one more show before dawn. Redoubt Volcano, about 50 miles distant, is visible at left while the light of the aurora is reflected in the cold salty water of Cook Inlet. I used a 4x5 camera and Fuji Provia 100F to capture the early morning scene on September 17, 2003 from Clam Gulch on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Illiamna Death Dance

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Sep 25 10:19:01 2003 UTC



The 10,000 foot Aleutian volcano, Illiamna is prominent in the west as the green glow of the aurora borealis is reflected from the surface of Cook Inlet as seen from the Lower Kenai Peninsula near Anchor Point, Alaska. The aurora takes on a mottled look that I have nicknamed the "death dance" or "death mask". This usually occurs after the main breakup for the night in the "rotting" phase of an aurora and is an indication that the show is over. The "death mask" is also accompanied by faint flickering and pulsations. I have seen the aurora remain this way for a few hours with little change until dawn. I took this image on the early morning of September 16, 2003 with a 75mm lens and a 6x7 medium format camera using Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Double Halo

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Sep 25 09:57:01 2003 UTC



A 22 degree solar halo is prominent here complete with sundogs flanking on either side and an upper tangential arc above. Upon closer inspection a second halo is seen faintly at the 46 degree position. Ice crystals high in the atmosphere and usually indicative of an approaching warm front, are responsible for the phenomenon seen here in this early August 2003 photo from Homer, Alaska.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Crowning at Clam Gulch

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Sep 22 19:46:02 2003 UTC



South is up in this view looking nearly straight overhead as the aurora surged southward and passed through the magnetic zenith as seen from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. By the time I had swung the camera overhead, the most intense activity was already dying out as this intense crowning only lasted a few seconds. This is a 15-second exposure with a 6x9 cm medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens and Fuji 400f film taken at about 3:25 a.m. on September 17, 2003.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Western Veil

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Sep 22 19:15:03 2003 UTC



A curtain or veil forms in the west as the aurora suddenly brightened and surged southward around 3:15 local time on this early morning of September 17, 2003. The aurora raced overhead and had the most spectacular but brief crowning as it came from an arc about 20 degrees high in the northern sky to within 20 degrees of the southern sky in less than ten minutes! The sky was filled with bright flickering upon its passage that lit the shadows cast from the moon. These shadows danced like reflected sunlight off of water or like the gentle flames of a campfire. It was very soothing yet filled me with energy as my adrenalin kicked in at the excitement of the moment. I took this image with a medium format 6x9 cm. camera equipped with a 50mm lens and Fuji 400f film from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

A Fading Glory

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Sep 21 00:05:01 2003 UTC



The stars are going to bed as the east grows light with the comming of day. The aurora borealis decided to put on just one more show before the dawn completely wiped out all traces of this denizen of the night sky. I took this image with a 4x5 camera and 150mm lens on Fuji Provia 100f film at 6:00 a.m. local time September 16, 2003 from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Detail: Seventh Heaven

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 21:46:01 2003 UTC



This is a small section of the top of the hill enlarged from the Panorama below entitled"Seventh Heaven September". It illustrates the incredible detail of the originals. At this scale the panorama would measure 3 feet by 9 feet!

Seventh Heaven September

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 20:49:03 2003 UTC



Due to the Earth's position in its orbit around the Sun, September brings an abundance of auroral activity. This September has been no exception. I have been in the seventh heaven of the aurora and in a state of total bliss. The image seen here is taken on September 17, 2003 using a 4x5 camera with a 150mm lens on Kodak E100PP film. Two images were stitched together in Photoshop to make a 1:3 panorama of the scene from the beach at Clam Gulch, Alaska. The large format film provides a degree of detail not achievable on 35mm and when scanned at 1200 dpi, it created an image file over 350 megs. The image here is reduced to approximate the size of the cropped originals.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Mirror Pond Panorama

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 12:31:01 2003 UTC



As the auroral oval starts to dip down it becomes visible first as a glow on the northern horizon, then an arc. The arc is seen here low on the horizon as it started to brighten prior to becoming active. While not as spectacular as other auroral forms, an arc can be beautiful in its own subtle way. In this image, taken on September 18, 2003 just after midnight, this gentle beauty was multiplied by two as a still pond formed a mirror image. This photo was acquired with a medium format camera on Fuji Provia 400f.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Taiga Moon

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 00:24:01 2003 UTC



The moon shines brightly over a forest of taiga, a Russian word meaning "forest of small trees". The black spruce seen here are stunted by living in swampy ground known as muskeg and in an area of cold temperatures where 40 to 50 below is not uncommon in the winter months. This photo was taken on September 18, 2003 from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula just north of Soldotna while the northern lights provided a beautiful back lighting to the scene. A 6x9 medium format camera equipped with a 50mm lens and Fuji Provia 400F film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Starry Night Homer

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 10:34:02 2003 UTC

The lights of Homer, Alaska compliment the sky in this early morning scene on September 15, 2003. Orion and Taurus are prominent and Sirius has just risen as twilight begins to paint the sky with a cobalt cast. I took this with a 50mm lens on 6x7cm Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.aurordude.com

Moon, Mars and Moondog

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Sep 19 20:48:03 2003 UTC



The moon, low in the south, is dogged by the bright planet Mars to its left and also by a colorful rainbow-like "moondog", the lunar equivelent of a sundog. The strong moonlight is reflected in the waters of Cook Inlet's Kachemak Bay. The Kenai mountains, seen here, plunge into the sea at the very southern tip of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. I took this image from above Homer "at the end of the road". You can drive no further in the entire western hemisphere. Image acquired with a 6x7 cm camera 75mm lens and Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora Over Cook Inlet

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Sep 20 10:16:01 2003 UTC

Magical northern lights dance above Cook Inlet as seen from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula on the early morning of Septembet 16, 2003. We see here a diffuse arc accompanied by another active rayed band in this view looking northward. Snow-capped Redoubt Volcano is seen across the inlet about 50 miles distant. Under close scrutiny, Mount McKinley is just visible in the original on the distant horizon at right. This is a testiment to Alaska's clear nights as this 20,320 foot mountain is no less than 220 miles away from my location! This photo was taken with a 50mm lens on 6x9 medium format Fuji Provia 400 film.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

"AURORA AT 60 DEGREES"

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Oct 28 21:20:01 2007 UTC

This image is at the beginning of a spectacular break-up on the morning of September 17, 2003. The aurora suddenly brightened and surged southward coming overhead and filling the sky with beautiful draperies and a brief but intense crowning. This was the best of several "substorms" on this night. The aurora is reflected in the waters of Cook Inlet as seen from the beach at Clam Gulch, located Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. I took this photo using a 6x7 medium format camera and Kodak E100S film.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Southern Highlands

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Sep 15 15:40:01 2003 UTC



This image of the southern highlands of our moon was shot on Sept. 15 at 15:00 UT. I used an 8 inch scg telescope at 167 power using an Olympus C50 camera held up to the eyepiece for a 1/80 second exposure at 320 ISO. Transparency was good but turbulence left a lot to be desired. The image was bouncing all around and coming in and out of focus as we are presently experiencing cold north winds over the warm marine air here in Homer, Alaska.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Purple Rays

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Sep 11 18:38:01 2003 UTC



Tall purple rays reach up from the tangle of boat masts and rigging and into the bowl of the "Big Dipper" in this August 22, 2003 image from Homer, Alaska Taken about 2:00a.m. local time. I had spent the last couple hours waiting for a little activity and as these rays appeared I was able to get only two shots before they disappeared again and the aurora faded. The purple itself is produced in a process called resonance scattering whereby already ionized nitrogen molecules absorb and then immediately re-emit photons in this part of the spectrum. These photons are captured from direct sunlight as it reaches the upper parts of an aurora during twilight. We do not always see the purple directly as our dark-adapted eyes are not very sensitive in this part of the spectrum. More often film, without our human limitations, will capture the faint coloring. It is only during times of extreme brightness that we may witness this color visually ourselves. This photo was taken with a 50mm lens and medium format Fuji 400F.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Morning's Glory

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Sep 11 09:15:01 2003 UTC



The aurora came to us in the form of this gentle arc on this August 8, 2003 morning as seen here around 3:00 a.m. local time. Early dawn is already adding her ruddy hue to the distant horizon. The aurora is mirrored in the still waters of the local "Fishin' Hole" in Homer, Alaska while die-hard anglers are yet trying thier luck by flashlight unthwarted by the darkness and late hour of the night. The photo was taken with a 50mm lens on 6x7 medium format E100S film.

Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Visited

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Sep 10 09:05:01 2003 UTC



Just been kicking the dust off a few older images. Here's one from the evening of November 7, 1998. Homer Alaska was visited by the most intense overhead aurora on this otherworldly Saturday night. It seemed almost alien! Image acquired with a 24mm @2.8 for 40 seconds on fuji800 and a little imagination. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Mars September 02, 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Sep 2 12:36:02 2003 UTC



This image was acquired using an olympus 5050 held up to the eyepiece of my 8-inch schmidt-cassegrain. The eyepiece was at 167 power and the exposure was 1/80 second. I have enhanced it in photoshop for color/contrast and sharpness. The image approximates what I was able to see visually through all the atmospheric turbulence as Mars is quite low in the southern sky fom 60 degrees North latitude inHomer, Alaska.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Clouds Aug. 8, 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 21:21:01 2003 UTC



Here is yet another view of the fantastic display of the eerie luminescent cloud display observed on August 8, 2003. This view is looking northwards from Deep Creek on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula at 60 degrees north latitude and was around 2:30 a.m. local time. This image was acquired with a 6x7 medium format camera using a 75mm lens and Kodak E100VS film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aug 8, 2003 Noctilucent Clouds

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 10:13:02 2003 UTC



Here is another view of the fantastic n. cloud display on August 8. The view is due north around 2:00 a.m. local time. The image was taken from about 20 miles North of Homer, Alaska. I am not sure what is causing the reddish coloring on the top of the clouds but it is most likely smoke from any of the numerous fires that were burning in Alaska at the time. This image is taken with a 75mm lens on 6x7 medium format film. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Cloud Detail

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 09:59:04 2003 UTC



There is so much detail in photos taken on medium and large format film that the computer screen just cannot do them justice. Here is a detail from the photo of noctilucent clouds taken in Ninilchik (Below). The wavy patterns created by high altitude winds is apparent as well as the pearly luminescence. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Clouds and Faint Aurora Aug.8, 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 09:05:02 2003 UTC



As a bright display of noctilucent clouds hugged the northern horizon, faint rays of the aurora borealis vied for attention. Photographing both phenomenon togeather has proven very elusive. The noctilucent clouds are so much brighter than most auroral activity that in order to catch the aurora the clouds become overexposed. Some day perhaps a bold aurora will show at the same time as the rare n. clouds to make my life more complete! This image was taken just after 1:00 a.m. local time from near Homer, Alaska on a 6x9 medium format with E100S film and a 50mm lens. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

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