10/13/03 early activity, Fairbanks...

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Oct 14 23:04:01 2003 UTC

I was out early and caught this aurora activity at around 10 PM. Activity then slowed down. It wasn't till after midnight that geomagnetic storminess was once again on the rise. When I went out again, around 1 AM, the bright moon had conspired with a thin veil of ice crystal laden fog to obscured the stars. Oh well there's always tonight!

Picture parameters: ASA 800, f2.8 6 sec. exposure. Looking west. 10:13 PM. Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

10/7/03 AM Fairbanks, cont.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Oct 15 18:27:03 2003 UTC

A second show -- the matinee, commenced around 1:13 AM. Just as active as the first, but oriented a little more north. I went home around 1:30 AM -- I have to work in the morning, but the sky certainly wasn't through for the night.

Picture parameters: ASA 800, f2.8 6 sec. exposure. Looking east. 1:13 AM. Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

1AM Fairbanks 10/07/03 cont.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Oct 8 00:34:02 2003 UTC

Another shot from the "early show" around 1:00 AM. (I was out from 12:15 AM til 1:30 AM.) While I was watching, there were two flurries of activity with a short 15 minute intermission to recharge the gigawatt system.

Picture parameters: ASA 800, f2.8 6 sec. exposure. Looking NE. 1:04 AM. Fairbanks City Limits.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

October 7th AM. Fairbanks

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Oct 7 23:56:04 2003 UTC

STD high latitude "red alert" yesterday was right on the money. Those corona holes are just like clock work. Another web forecaster got lost in Parker's spiral -- no that isn't a bebop piece from the 50's.

Picture parameters: ASA 800, f2.8 6 sec. exposure. Looking east. 12:57 AM.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.



One eye on the sky. Sept. 19, 2003.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Sep 19 18:23:01 2003 UTC



Backyard picture.

Turned out that it was my best opportunity to shoot a few pictures. I appreciated the ironic humor of the night. It must of been a sort of "glimse of hell" sketch from a Saturday Night Live or a Mad TV script.

ASA 800, f4.0, 8 sec. exposure. Looking Southeast.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

Aurora over GI/IARC at Univ. of Alaska. 9/18/03 AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Sep 19 01:50:01 2003 UTC



I was on the West Ridge of the Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks campus. Among pictures snapped was the aurora over the Geophysical Institute's Elvey Building, home of a space physics research group that is known worldwide for their work on aurora related physics and plasmas.

Also pictured is the "GI" sister Institute, the International Arctic Research Center or IARC, which is focuses on measurements, monitoring, and modelling related to global climate change and the Arctic's regions climate system. If you're not from Alaska, you'd never guess that such interesting research was being conducted at such a high tech facility in the middle of Alaska. High tech facilities? How about the 118th fastest computer in the world -- a Cray X1/60 and a NASA supported rocket launching facility? Well you get the picture.

Those are Castor and Pollux, the Gemini twins who aren't, rising over the IARC/Elvey buildings, along with a waning half moon (although such a long exposure renders it as a second sun or a super nova. Now why didn't Chevy come out with one of those?)

ASA 200, 15 sec. exp., f4.0. Looking Northeast.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

The End of the Day -- Sept. 17, 2003

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Thu Sep 18 19:25:01 2003 UTC



ASA 200, 15 sec. exp., f4.0. 11:54-11:55 PM. Looking East. Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

Heaven's Lips, August 23, 2003 AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Sep 3 00:52:01 2003 UTC

Let me get an aurora shot in edgeways. Guess what, it's not from Canada!

ASA 400, f2.8, 4 second exposure. 12:34 AM. Corona. Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu.

August sky.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Aug 22 23:22:01 2003 UTC

August Sky.

Just the facts: ASA 400, 6 sec. exposure, f4, WNW. 12:28 AM. Fairbanks, Alaska. 8/18/03.


Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Straight up!

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Aug 22 19:05:01 2003 UTC

Hey, isn't that Paula Abdul's line?

Just the facts: ASA 400, 4 sec. exposure, f2.8, straight up. 2:33 AM. Fairbanks, Alaska. Corona. 8/21/03.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

8/21/03 AM aurora, continued:

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Aug 22 19:05:01 2003 UTC

This night a turn around the compass rose lead to as many photo ops. I thought, "What sort of stage is this anyway? A proscenium?" No. It was more like a hybrid arena stage thrust into the heavens, with the observer at the center and the action all around.

Photo parameters: ASA 400, 6 sec. exposure, f2.8, looking ENE, 2:30 AM. Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Spectacular Aurora 8/21/03 AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Aug 22 19:46:01 2003 UTC

My wife returned from a trip home this past Wednesday night, so I was once again whole. I celebrated her homecoming and the heavens obliged with an evening of spectacular aurora -- best display so far this summer for Fairbanks. At times I was dizzied by the activity. Where to point the camera? Up!

Photo parameters: ASA 800, 6 sec. exposure, f2.8. Looking WNW. Fairbanks, Alaska. 2:21 AM.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Aurora continued... 8/18/03.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Aug 19 00:52:01 2003 UTC

Here is the sister display to my previous submission. This is looking WSW. 1:00 AM, 8/18/03, Fairbanks, Alaska.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Dancin' between the Moon & Mars. 8/18/03.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Mon Aug 18 23:41:01 2003 UTC

There was a nice aurora display this morning here in Fairbanks, Alaska. I was out from 'round midnight till 2:00 AM. The activity was concentrated in the southern skies, i.e. ESE thru WSW. It was a good show. Definitely worth loosing sleep over.

Camera settings for this picture: 3 sec. exposure, f3.3, ASA 400. 'Round 1:00 AM. Looking ESE.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Dark enough to catch the aurora.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Thu Aug 14 00:39:01 2003 UTC

I was out the morning of August 8, 2003 from 12:00 AM til 2:00 AM. watching and photographing the aurorae and noctilucent clouds. Image captured at 12:59 AM. ADST Camera setting: 4 sec, f4, ASA 400. Looking north. As you can tell -- there still is no official night here in Fairbanks, Alaska. Not till Sept. 4th. Until then it is various shades of twilight: civil, nautical, and astronomical. While not spectacular, the aurora was moderately active and it was worth my time to stand out for a couple of hours.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Noctilucent Clouds: 8/10/03 early AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Thu Aug 14 00:18:01 2003 UTC

Fairbanks, Alaska 2:50 AM. Looking north. Camera settings: ASA 400, f5.6, and 5 second exposure. The ripples in the sky are the noctilucent clouds. They appear brighter than in this picture, although the rest of the sky's color and appearance is accurate.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu


Slim pickings, May 1, early AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed May 7 23:14:01 2003 UTC

Was out from 'round 1:30 AM till 2:30 AM. As it turned out, it was more for the cool, fresh, evening air and the sounds of the night, mixed with radio jazz, then it was about aurora watching. I did hear my first wood frog of the season -- his churping croak announcing the beginning of mating season. The females that weren't still in their winter torpor, were probably ignoring him. I only heard a single croak.

There was much diffuse aurora to the south, but in our perpetual twilight, it is hard to appreciate the shifting shapes and fixed patterns of this sort of display. At this time of year, the scattered light from the northern lip of the earth, veils the heavens so effectively that all but the most brilliant stars refuse to shine.

This picture is from one of the very short and fleeting periods of activity which shown only a minimum of familiar, well-formed, aurora structure.

The photo is oriented S. The camera settings are: ASA 400, f2.8, 10 second exposure. The temperature at this time was approximately +32 F.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Looking east, 1:50 AM. 4/30/03. Fairbanks.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Apr 30 19:10:03 2003 UTC

This photo is the eastern end of previous image posted as "Aurora in the nautical twilight."

Photo oriented E. Camera settings: ASA 400, f2.8, 8 second exposure. Temperature +26 F.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Aurora in the nautical twilight. Fairbanks, 4/30/03, AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Apr 30 18:55:02 2003 UTC

As arctic darkness gives way to perpetual light, one's window of opportunity for viewing your average, moderately active aurora, indubitably shrinks. In Fairbanks, you have to be outside looking up within the 12:30 AM to 2:30 AM time slot. This morning, I was out from about 1:30 AM till 2:30 AM. The "active" aurora forecast seemed a little generous, judging from what was offered up on stage here in Fairbanks. But on this cool and breezy morning there was something to photograph.

Photo oriented NW. Camera settings: ASA 400, f2.8, 8 second exposure. Temperature +26 F.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Halo. 8:00 AM, 4/24/03. Fairbanks.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri May 2 00:40:01 2003 UTC

This halo greeted me as I arrived to work this morning.

Camera setting: 1/1000th second exposure, f8, ASA/ISO 100. Looking E. 8:00 AM.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Still feeling the CME heat this Thursday morning, 4/24.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Fri Apr 25 00:42:01 2003 UTC

There were moderately active patches of aurora, mostly in the southern sky last night and this morning. Of course when I wrapped things up at 2:00 AM, and was headed home, all hell broke loose! I pulled off the road and quickly set up to take a few photos. For about ten minutes there was a wonderfully modern, dance of light which seemed choreographed by a lesser god with Martha Graham's sense of brash, arrogant movement.

Camera setting: 6 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. Looking W. 2:05 AM.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

CME on the 21st = Great Aurora on the 23rd AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Thu Apr 24 00:54:01 2003 UTC

This morning (4/23), the aurora activity was just grand. We're talking south, north, east, west, and overhead. It was rather late, though; I was out from roughly 1:30 AM till after 3 AM. (Just for your information, in Fairbanks, nautical twilight almost bridges the night -- it will officially bridge on the night on 4/26.)

Adding to the excitement of the night, was the fact that I spied black bear spoor on Monday night on a couple of the trails in the vicinity. So this morning, I had my bear spray strapped to my belt. But you can hear a pin drop from miles away at this time of the night, so I didn't pay much attention. Besides, the superb jazz music from my truck's radio parked in the distance would of kept away all but the most sophisticated, well-fed bears, which probably wouldn't of wanted to tangle with me in the middle of the night anyways.

Camera setting: 6 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 800. Looking SSW. 2:38 AM.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Soon we'll loose the night. 4/20/2003 12:43 AM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Apr 22 22:37:01 2003 UTC

Twilight past midnight backlights a moderately active aurora. Looking NNW. Fairbanks, Alaska

Camera setting: 6 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 800.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

5 minutes later... Unfurled Tentacle of Light.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Apr 15 01:52:03 2003 UTC

April 9 at 11:20 PM. (See also: "Unfurling Tentacle of Light.")

Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 800.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Unfurling Tentacle of Light

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Tue Apr 15 01:40:01 2003 UTC

Great display. Mild weather. Taken the night of April 9 at 11:15 PM. Looking NNW. Of course where else, but Fairbanks, Alaska.

Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 800.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Electric Dreams. Night of 4/07/03.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Wed Apr 9 02:50:01 2003 UTC

A Corona Mass Ejection had provided energy for this night's sky theater. With a jump back to standard time, the twilight pierces deep into the night. The temperature was mild. The crescent of the waxing moon, provided just enough light to make the foreground mysterious and romantic. A light breeze carried a fox's appeal for a mate.

Camera setting: 10 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. 11:39 PM. Looking UP.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Corona. April 3rd night. 11:16 PM.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Mon Apr 7 19:45:01 2003 UTC



Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. Looking UP.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Another shot. April 3rd evening. Fairbanks.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Mon Apr 7 19:37:02 2003 UTC

Another one from the night of 3rd/4th April. 11:48 PM. Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. Looking SW.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Looking straight up. Diffuse aurora/corona overhead.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Sat Apr 5 20:32:01 2003 UTC

Intently watching diffuse aurora and corona offers up a chance to conjure form from formlessness -- something akin to patterns spied in billowing clouds on lazy summer afternoons. This is an example from the night of April 3, 2003.

Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. Looking UP.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

Knot of Light. 4/3/03. Fairbanks.

Submitted by: Jeff Pederson at Sat Apr 5 19:15:01 2003 UTC

The evening's sky started off partly cloudy, but the clouds eventually cleared. An active aurora was forecast, but the magnetometer's jumping got me to stick my head out earlier then planned. Our public radio station KUAC came through with a great soundtrack for the night. If you follow the light around it the aurora appears as a sort-of knot -- like a shoe lace.

Camera setting: 8 second exposure, f2.8, ASA/ISO 400. Looking SW.

Please respect my copyright. You may contact me at fnjjp@uaf.edu

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