SUN PILLAR

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 08:27:01 2003 UTC



Every now and then conditions become just right to see this phenomena known as a sun pillar. The right sort of ice cystals can make it appaer that a beam of light is standing upright above the sun. This is of course illusory in much the same way that advertisers paint their stuff on sports fields in such a way that the words appear to 'pop' out of the ground.

 

Additional Images by this Photographer:

Summertime Surprise

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Wed Feb 15 09:17:02 2006 UTC



This beautiful Circum Horizontal Arc (CHA) graced our southern summer skies for nearly 30 minutes on January 30th, 2005. This was easily the best example that I have seen of a CHA.Many people in our area who had never noticed a CHA were stunned by the brilliant colours and the longevity of the display.

Taken from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, North Island, New Zealand. 70mm lens @ f/11500/sec on Fuji 200.

Flyingfish No. 2 Close Up

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Wed Feb 15 09:03:01 2006 UTC



A final zoom in on the iridescent fish just before it was swallowed by the sun.

200mm @ f/32 1000/sec Fuji 200.

Flying Fish No. 2

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Wed Feb 15 09:03:01 2006 UTC



Within 5 minutes of the first two pictures in this series the fish had chaged shape.

100mm @ f/32 1000/sec Fuji 200.

Flying Fish No. 1 Close Up

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Wed Feb 15 09:03:01 2006 UTC



A close of this iridescent fish seen from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, North Island, New Zealand on Nov 9th 2005.

200mm lens @ f/32 1000/sec on Fuji 200.

Flying Fish No. 1

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Wed Feb 15 08:48:01 2006 UTC



This fish-like iridescent cloud appeared near my home on Nov 9th 2005. All of the colours were visible to the un-aided eye. This photo was taken with a 100mm lens at f/32 and 1000/sec on Fuji 200.

Taken from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, North Island, New Zealand.

Last Hurrah?

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sat Nov 20 22:47:01 2004 UTC



The Southern Cross and Pointers feature on the left while the tail of Scorpius and Sagittarius are on the right in this intense part of the sub-storm that occurred at 9.50 U.T. on November 8th, 2004. We had to drive 150km to get a clear view but it was well worth it. This was the first aurora that I had seen for just over a year. Is it the last fling of Solar Cycle 23 especially for lower to mid latitude observers?

This is two 28mm shots @ f/2.5. 30 seconds on Fuji X-Tra 400 taken from Carterton in the North Island of New Zealand.

Canopus Nadir

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 09:53:03 2003 UTC

>From 40 degrees South the sky's 2nd brightest star, Canopus, is circumpolar. This nearly 2 hour exposure with a 210mm lens on Fuji 200 film shows Canopus swinging down from the right to reach its'lowest point above the peaks of the Tararua Ranges, Lower North Island, New Zealand, using near Full Moonlight to show the foreground. Notice the film's reciprocitry failure kicking in as Canopus fades off to the left.

(c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper. All rights reserved. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

Smoke Signals

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 09:32:01 2003 UTC

In 1996 Mt Ruapehu (pronounced - Roo-ah-pay-who) started another period of eruptive activity with this early morning series reminiscent of controlled 'smoke signals.' Taken on June 17th, 1996 with a 70mm lens from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, New Zealand.

(c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper. All rights reserved. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

Morning Cough!

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 09:12:02 2003 UTC

In 1995 New Zealand's highest volcanoe, Mt Ruapehu, underwent a period sustained eruptions that were seen from great distances. This sunrise eruption was captured with a 400mm lens from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, some 118 km's (75 miles) south of the mountain on September 27th, 1995.

(c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper. All rights reserved. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

HALLEY Remembered

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 10:12:01 2003 UTC



Hard to believe that we are still getting images from Earth of this famous visitor 17 years after it graced our skies. Halley wasn't a "Great" comet on it's last visit but from New Zealand it certainly was a 'good' comet. This is how we saw Halley rising in the morning sky.

Photo taken on March 18th, 1986 at 15.45 U.T. using a 50mm @ f/2.8. Exposure was 15 minutes on Agfa 1000 colour film.

Moonlit Rays

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 08:39:02 2003 UTC

Despite the presence of a Moon 3 days from Full these bright southern rays were still impressive during the Great Storm of August 12th, 2000. The 'Diamond Cross,' top right, the 'False Cross,' bottom centre-right and Canopus bottom left are the 'stars' of this picture taken from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, New Zealand. 50mm lens @ f/1.4. 12 seconds on Fuji Superia 400. (c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper. All rights reserved. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

Break-up Time

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 08:39:02 2003 UTC

One of the early displays for mid-latitude observers in Cycle 23 came on February 18th, 1999. This shot came at the height of the "Break-up" period as seen from the Manawatu, Lower North Island, New Zealand. 28mm lens @ f/2.5. 30 seconds on Fuji 400 colour film. (c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper. All rights reserved. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

The Blue Staircase

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Mon Sep 29 08:18:01 2003 UTC

The Great Auroral Storm of November 24th, 2001 produced this sun-bleached set of ascending rays in the southern sky as seen from the Manawatu, Lower North Island, New Zealand. Lens was a 28mm @ f/2.5, 30 seconds on Fuji Superia 400.

(c) Copyright 2003 Ian Cooper All rights reserved.

Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

Volcanoe Eclipse

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 10:12:01 2003 UTC



Mt Taranaki/Egmont is an Andesite volcanoe that stands at 8,260 feet out on the western part of the North Island of New Zealand. From 100 miles south east of the mountain the volcanoe is just the right size to 'eclipse' the sun as it sets.

This photo was taken with a 1000mm lens at f/10 using a double exposure of 1/4000th second at sun set then a 1/125th second five minutes later to catch the twilight.

UFO Lurking

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 09:17:01 2003 UTC



This UFO looking lenticular cloud was part of a Nor' West arch sequence over the Tararua Ranges, Lower North Island, New Zealand. 400mm lens.

Menacing Shadows

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 09:17:01 2003 UTC



These dark crepuscular rays closed in on the setting sun one summer's night from home.



Crepuscular Tree

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Sep 28 08:52:01 2003 UTC




Foggy morning winter sunrise filtering through a Macrocarpa tree out on the farm.

Golden Delight

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sun Jul 20 09:44:01 2003 UTC

In February 18th, 1999 this delightful bunch of rays in the south west annouced the unexpected ( the computer was in getting repaired) arrival of this Aurora Australis display. The orange was very noticeable as was the green but the blue appeared whiter to the naked eye. Taken with a 50mm lens @ f/1.4 for 12 seconds on Fuji Xtra 400 from Glen Oroua, Manawatu, New Zealand.

Copyright (c) Ian Cooper. Contact: icoops@inspre.net.nz

NEAT CABBAGES AND AURORAL GLOW

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sat Mar 8 21:17:01 2003 UTC



On March 4th at 8.38 U.T. I caught Comet NEAT (C/2002 V1) between two cabbage trees on the side of the road near my home in the Manawatu, North Island, New Zealand. I hadn't noticed the glow as it was just at the end of twilight. The lens was 50mm @ f/1.4, exposure 20 seconds on Fuji P800. The comet was mag 4.0-4.5, and tail was 4 degrees long in bino's.

THE BLUE TOWERS

Submitted by: Ian Cooper at Sat Sep 7 08:09:01 2002 UTC

During the Great Auroral Storm of November 24th, 2001 I witnessed for the first time auroral features passing beyond my zenith. The base of these blue rays (bleached by sunlight) were some 600 kms south of me indicating that these rays are as big as they possibly can be! I used a 28mm lens at f/2.5. 30 second exposures on Fuji Superia 400. My location is E 175 25 , S 40 20.

Copyright (c) 2002 Ian Cooper. Contact: icoops@inspire.net.nz

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