Noctilucent Clouds and Faint Aurora Aug.8, 2003

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 09:05:02 2003 UTC



As a bright display of noctilucent clouds hugged the northern horizon, faint rays of the aurora borealis vied for attention. Photographing both phenomenon togeather has proven very elusive. The noctilucent clouds are so much brighter than most auroral activity that in order to catch the aurora the clouds become overexposed. Some day perhaps a bold aurora will show at the same time as the rare n. clouds to make my life more complete! This image was taken just after 1:00 a.m. local time from near Homer, Alaska on a 6x9 medium format with E100S film and a 50mm lens. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

August 8, 2003 Noctilucent Cloud Display

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Aug 20 07:00:01 2003 UTC



On August 8th I was fortunate enough to witness a fantastic display of noctilucent clouds. Unfortunately, as beautiful as they are there is a growing body of evidence that connects increased sightings of the rare clouds with increased atmospheric pollution levels. Smoke from distant forest fires paints the horizon orange in contrast to the bluish clouds. This image is from the village of Ninilchik on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula and is acquired with a medium format camera and Fuji Provia 100f. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctiluscent Clouds at Moose River

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Jul 24 22:18:01 2003 UTC



A rare showing of noctiluscent cluds are seen here reflected in the Moose River of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula in the early morning of July 19, 2003. The bluish clouds are actually water ice cristals at about 50 miles altitude and are reflecting the sun's rays as it is a few degrees below the northern horizon seen here around local midnight about 2:30 a.m. This image was acquired with a 55mm lens on a medium format camera and Fuji MS100 film. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctiluscent Clouds Reflected

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jul 18 08:37:01 2003 UTC



A rare, bluish-colored noctiluscent cloud display is reflected in the tranquil waters of Baluga Lake in Homer, Alaska on this early July 15, 2003 morning. The mysterious clouds, composed of water ice crystals at an altitude of about 50 miles, catch the rays of the summer sun while it is only a few degrees below the northern horizon creating the almost-eerie luminence. This is a 5-second exposure on E100VS Ektachrome with a 40mm lens at f/4 on a medium format camera. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Dawn's Early Light

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jun 27 10:29:02 2003 UTC

A tall ray of auroral light reaches skyward and into direct sunlight where nitrogen molecules are coaxed into producing beautiful blue-violet light. This image was taken on May 7, 2003 from Homer, Alaska. Twilight is present at this time of year even at 2:00 a.m. (local midnight). It creates a nice reddish glow on the northern horizon that is both sunset and sunrise at the same time. I used a medium format 6x9 cm camera with a 50mm 2.8 lens and Kodak E100VS film to capture the scene. Copyright (c) 2003 by Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Moon in June

Submitted by: auroraak@ptialaska.net at Thu Jun 19 23:42:01 2003 UTC



This yellow-orange moon was low in the sky over the Kenai Mountains as see n from Homer, Alaska on Friday, June 13, 2003. This photo was from my deck

using a 610mm lens and Fuji 800 print film in a 6x7 medium format. Twilight, which permeates the short nights at this time of year at 60 degrees north latitude, provides the lighting for the mountains in this 1:00 a.m. shot.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Visit at www.auroradude.com or

contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net


Pipeline and Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Apr 14 00:36:01 2003 UTC

The aurora borealis dances above the Trans-Alaskan Oil Pipeline in this still from the animation below. The pipeline represents many things to many people. Profits for the major oil companies, jobs for many Alaskans and others, tax and dividend revenue for the State of Alaska and its citizens, fuel for all of our gluttonous activities, plastics and other products used in our daily lives, and perhaps even real and potential harm to the fragile environment that it spans. The pipeline could even be an eyesore to some but to me it represents a great monument to man's achievements. I can see it as a work of art as it rises up over the land and weaves its way along the contours of hills, mountains, and rivers, inspiring even, as Cristo's "Running Fence" or China's Great wall. Oh yea, the aurora borealis is nice too! Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net

Animated Pipeline Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Apr 13 23:38:01 2003 UTC



Please click the image at left to download a short animation of the Aurora Borealis. This could take a couple minutes depending on your computer/connection. The file is just under 2 megs. The animation was filmed on January 24, 2003 from Near Delta Junction, Alaska where the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline, seen here, starts its journey up through a mountain pass in the Central Alaskan Range. The sequence was filmed with a 6x9cm medium format camera and 50mm lens during strong moonlight. Real time elapsed is just over 5 minutes and is compressed to about 10 seconds here.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora at Miller's Peak

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Apr 10 22:24:02 2003 UTC



I had watched the aurora since dusk as a faint arc slowly swung southward and then suddenly increased its intensity a hundred fold as it came overhead around 11:00 p.m. local time. I could actually see "eddies" and "currents" in what resembled a fast moving river as charged particles streamed overhead from West to East. The display was so intense and my level of excitement was so elevated that I forgot about the minus- 50 wind-chill and quickly received another reminder from "Frosty" when he nipped my bare fingers after removing a glove for a couple minutes to change film. The bright aurora seen here, lights up a snow-covered Miller Peak of the Central Alaska Range on this January 24, 2003 evening. A 50mm lens on 6x9 medium format Ektachrome 200 was used to capture this image. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Aurora at Willow Lake

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Apr 10 20:43:01 2003 UTC



After a night filled with very intense early-evening activity this colorful aurora is seen moving northwards in the early morning hours of September 4, 2002. This view is looking to the East and Southeast where the aurora is reflected off the surface of Willow Lake, which is located near Wrangle St. Elias National Park in South-Central Alaska. The familiar Hyades and Pleiades star clusters of Taurus shine through the aurora, at center and upper right, as bright Saturn blazes to the left in this image acquired with a medium format 6x7 camera and a 75mm lens on Kodak E100S film. Copyright (c) 2002 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Twilight Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Apr 8 21:25:01 2003 UTC

Twilight is a special time for auroras. As the upper reaches of an aurora are exposed to direct sunlight nitrogen molecules begin to interact with certain photons in the purple area of the visible spectrum. First these photons are absorbed but then immediately they are released resulting in a beautiful purple light. This process is known as resonance scattering and it only occurs with nitrogen. Direct sunlight most often causes the effect but strong moonlight can also trigger resonance scattering. Unfortunately, our eyes are least sensitive to this part of the spectrum and it is more often photographed than directly observed. It is only on rare occasions that the emissions might be bright enough to be seen visually. This image was captured on medium format Ektachrome 200 and a 50mm lens at 7:30 a.m. on January 24, 2003 near Delta Junction, Alaska. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Moonlight Magic

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Apr 7 11:34:01 2003 UTC

The light of a bright moon transforms a stand of spruce trees and willow, flocked with hoarfrost and fresh snow, into a magical garden of glass and brilliant gems as the stars, diamond-like themselves, pierce the blue canopy of the sky. An emerald green aurora emerges above the brightness and adds its own special magic to the night. It was coyotes that yipped when the moon first rose but now it was distant wolves that sang. Nearby, a great-horned owl answered the call and I felt truly alive. This January 2003 scene was captured from Alaska on Kodak E100s using a 20mm f2.8 lens while holding my breath. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Andromeda Mist

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Jun 2 05:50:01 2006 UTC

Mist, carried by a gentle breeze, drifts up from the Gulkana River on the South flank of the Central Alaska Range on this minus-25 January morning as an active aurora dances overhead. The water looked invitingly warm as the steam rose from it but I knew it was just an illusion and that the water temp couldn't have been much above freezing. I struggled to keep warm by marching constantly between three cameras that I had set up several yards apart for this purpose. Later this morning, I reminded myself how dangerous extreme cold can be when I threw a mitten off to grab the metal rail of a 4x5 camera as I was struggling to get it mounted on a tripod resulting in minor frostbite within seconds. "Mr. Frosty" nipped me a couple more times on this two-week solo winter camping expedition before I finally got his message and headed south to the warm sunshine of Mexico for "margarita therapy". This image was acquired on a home-built 6x9 medium format camera using Fuji 400f and a 50mm f2.8 lens. Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Crystal Vision

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Apr 13 09:12:01 2003 UTC

Like an ethereal image in a great crystal ball, the entire sky is captured here using an 8mm circular fisheye lens. North appears at the bottom, West on the left, South at the top and East at right. The moon is low in the Southeastern sky as Jupiter shines brightly in the West. Overhead the stars of the "Big Dipper" point north. The sky is filled with a flickering post-breakup aurora on this early morning in late January 2003. Amazingly, although dancing wildly in a flame-like fashion the aurora held its basic structure for this five-minute exposure. Its bluish color must be the result of resonance scattering as nitrogen molecules receive extra energy from the moonlight and the approaching dawn. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

A Midwinter Night's Scene

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 27 09:28:01 2003 UTC

Moonlight reflects off the shiny metal surface of the 48-inch diameter Trans-Alaskan Oil Pipeline as it passes the half-way mark on its 800-mile plus journey from Alaska's North Slope oil fields to the marine terminal in Valdez. Winter constellations shine brilliantly in the southern sky as the pipeline heads up and over the Central Alaska Range in this January 2003 image.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Omega Over Fort Greely

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Mar 14 19:14:01 2003 UTC

Here we have a classic "Omega" feature - named for the shape that resembles the Greek letter. The lights on the distant horizon are from the Fort Greely Military Reservation near Delta Junction, Alaska where our troops receive training for extreme cold weather. I even heard distant explosions on this Late-January 2003 night during some nocturnal exercises. This is also the site for the proposed Strategic Missile Defense System which is currently under construction. ' Hard to think of such things while such a peaceful auroral display is in progress.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Break-up at Forty-mile

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Thu Mar 13 08:14:01 2003 UTC

This image is a composite made from two large format 4x5 transparencies taken in the early morning of January 30, 2003. The view is of the northern sky from the headwaters of the wild and scenic Forty-mile River in East-Central Alaska during a very bright and active "break-up". If a nice 35mm image is capable of a sharp enlargement of say 12x18 inches, this image would measure 4 feet by 10 feet under similar enlargement! The richness of detail in large format can actually give a feeling of "being there" as opposed to merely viewing a photograph.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Sentinels

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sun Mar 9 01:09:01 2003 UTC

Like the giant stone figures of Rapa Nui or Easter Island, condensers of a passive ammonia system on the Trans-Alaska Oil Pipeline act as sentinels, perhaps guarding the flow of energy within. They stand as witness to the rising of the moon and the beginnings of the nice auroral display that has commenced on this January 20, 2003 evening about 20 miles South of Delta Junction on the northern flank of the Central Alaska Range. Clouds glow orange in the warm colored light of the just-risen moon as a sprinkle of stars shows through well-spaced openings. The planet Jupiter blazes above right in this surrealistic image.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Season's First Aurora

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 20:01:02 2003 UTC

Active rays of the aurora borealis are barely seen above the strong twilight of this August 1, 2003 night. This was the first signs of activity since early May due to the constant light of the northern summers. Noctilucent clouds are seen low on the northern horizon in this colorful image taken near Ninilchik, Alaska on the Kenai Peninsula.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com


Noctilucent Clouds

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 20:48:01 2003 UTC

A beautiful display of noctilucent clouds as seen from Homer, Alaska on the early morning of July 26, 1995.

Copyright (c) 1995 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Cloud Panorama

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 19:54:02 2003 UTC

This panorama was created from three separate 35mm images and spans from Southwest to Northeast during a late-August 1997 noctilucent cloud display over Cook Inlet as seen from near Homer, Alaska.

Copyright (c) 1997 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Clouds

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 20:55:01 2003 UTC

This wild display of eerie blue noctilucent clouds was photographed from near Homer, Alaska in Late August of 1997. While it remains a mystery as to how the water vapor that forms these night-time clouds gets up to the 50-mile altitude where they are found, this photo seems to show one process in action as water vapor carried upward by wind and convection forms cirrus clouds and then is carried even higher by winds aloft. Strato-volcanos sending ash plumes high into the atmosphere are also believed to contribute to the formation of the mysterious clouds.

Copyright (c) 1997 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Mysterious Blue Clouds

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 21:03:01 2003 UTC

This display of the mysterious noctilucent clouds was photographed from Polson, Montana on July 1, 1988. The latitude of Polson is about 48 degrees north, once considered the lower limit for sightings of these bluish nocturnal clouds. Recently, there have been many sightings further south. The reason for this is uncertain as little is known about this atmospheric phenomenon.

Copyright (c) 1987 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroraak@ptialaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Cloud Waves

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 21:10:01 2003 UTC

This image is of a fantastic display of the mysterious blue clouds from Homer, Alaska on July 26, 1995. This view, to the Northeast, shows some of the wave patterns often associated with the high-altitude clouds. The waves are the result of shaping by tremendous winds at the 50-mile high altitude where these clouds form.

Copyright (c) 1996 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Noctilucent Cloud Display

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Wed Mar 12 17:46:01 2003 UTC

This nice nocturnal cloud display was seen from Homer, Alaska during August of 1997. The display lasted all of our short "night" which was permeated by strong twilight. Only a few of the brightest stars are visible at this time of year due to the long days of our northern summers. (Note the bright star Capella at right in this photo.) Copyright (c) 1997 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Mystical Lights

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Tue Mar 4 19:00:01 2003 UTC



Aries and Andromeda provide a sprinkle of background stars in this view of the mystical northern lights from the northern flank of the Central Alaska Range. The image was acquired with a large format 4x5 camera equipped with a 150mm/2.8 lens and Kodak EPP100 film on January 23, 2003. Copyright (c) Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

River Above, River Below

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 21:28:01 2003 UTC

Electrons flow above resulting in a river of auroral light as liquid water flows in the icy river below on a moonlit morning along the Gulkana River of the Central Alaska Range. Due to an unseasonably warm winter, there was still open water on this snowy January 22, 2003 morning but as the temperature dropped below minus 20 (F) the ice prevailed and this open water was gone by the next morning. A 50mm lens and 6x9 medium format E100S film were used to acquire this image. copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroraak@ptialaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Energy Flows

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Fri Feb 7 03:19:01 2003 UTC



The Trans-Alaska Oil Pipeline passes overhead bringing crude oil from its source on Alaska's North Slope oil fields to the marine termainal in Valdez. The aurora borealis is alive with its own flow of energy as seen from Donnelly Dome near Delta Junction in this image acquired on January 23, 2003.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C.Anderson Contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Cabin by the Lake

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Mon Feb 3 23:14:01 2003 UTC



The moon had risen minutes earlier and sat low over the southeast horizon as the Northern Lights danced above this rustic A-frame cabin located at Summit Lake near Paxon, Alaska on the southern flank of the Central Alaska Range. I set up my tripod in the middle of the road but was not worried about traffic as the last vehicle had passed by several hours ago on this minus-twenty night and remote streach of the Richardson highway. The occupants had even abandoned their modest shelter during the long cold winter while waiting for a short but warmer summer.

Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis C. Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

Resurrection

Submitted by: Dennis Anderson at Sat Mar 8 21:28:01 2003 UTC

A simple log structure was built 100 years ago and served as a general store and post office for the tiny community of Meier's Lake, Alaska. It had fallen into ruin after a new building was built in the late '60's. The rustic building was saved from decay in the summer of 2002 when local residents restored and converted it to a chapel. It now hosts services once a month for a tiny congregation which averages about five souls. An inner light shines from the chapel as the northern lights dance over this mid-winter scene at midnight January 27-28, 2003 Copyright (c) 2003 Dennis Anderson contact at auroradude@acsalaska.net or visit www.auroradude.com

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